1380 Volodia

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1380 Volodia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Boyer
Discovery site Algiers Observatory
Discovery date 16 March 1936
Designations
MPC designation 1380 Volodia
Named after
Vladimir Vesselovsky
(newborn on discovery)[2]
1936 FM
main-belt · (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 79.16 yr (28912 days)
Aphelion 3.4749 AU (519.84 Gm)
Perihelion 2.8316 AU (423.60 Gm)
3.1532 AU (471.71 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.10200
5.60 yr (2045.2 d)
88.946°
0° 10m 33.672s / day
Inclination 10.409°
359.07°
247.27°
Earth MOID 1.83991 AU (275.247 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.63323 AU (244.328 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.173
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 23.266±0.190 km[4]
21.76±1.03 km[5]
24.09 km (calculated)[3]
h (0.33 d)[1][6]
0.0749±0.0148[4]
0.078±0.018[5]
0.058 (assumed)[3]
C[3]
11.8

1380 Volodia, provisional designation 1936 FM, is a carbonaceous asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 23 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by French astronomer Louis Boyer at Algiers Observatory, Algeria, in North Africa, on 16 March 1936.[7] Five nights later, the body was independently discovered by Belgian astronomer Eugène Delporte at the observatory in Uccle, Belgium.[2]

The C-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.8–3.5 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,044 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.10 and is tilted by 10 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 8 hours[6] and an albedo of 0.075–0.078, as observed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and subsequent NEOWISE mission.[4][5] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a somewhat lower albedo of 0.058.[3]

The minor planet's name is the diminutive of the Russian name Vladimir. It was named after Vladimir Vesselovsky, born the night of the asteroid's discovery.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1380 Volodia (1936 FM)" (2015-05-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 27 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1380) Volodia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 112. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1380) Volodia". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1380) Volodia". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "1380 Volodia (1936 FM)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 

External links[edit]