Weizsäcker family

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The (von) Weizsäcker (German: [(fɔn) ˈvaɪtszɛkɐ]) family, which hails from the former Kingdom of Württemberg, has been prominent and influential over the span of several generations. Its members include a Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Württemberg, a President of Germany, a leading diplomat, a prominent environmental scientist and the physicist after whom the Bethe-Weizsäcker formula was named.

I. Christian Ludwig Weizsäcker (1785–1831), preacher at Öhringen
A. Hugo Weizsäcker (1820–1834)
B. Karl Heinrich Weizsäcker (1822–1899), Protestant theologian and Chancellor of Tübingen University
1. Karl von Weizsäcker (1853–1926), 1906–1918 Ministerpräsident to King William II of Württemberg
a. Ernst von Weizsäcker (1882–1951), diplomat who served as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassador to the Holy See
i. Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker (1912–2007), physicist and philosopher
(a). Carl Christian von Weizsäcker (born 1938), professor of political economy
(b). Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker (born 1939), scientist and politician
(1). Jakob von Weizsäcker (born 1970), economist and politician (MEP)
(c) Elisabet von Weizsäcker *1940), historian and linguist
(d) Heinrich Wolfgang von Weizsäcker (born 1947) Mathematician
ii. Heinrich von Weizsäcker (1917–1939), German Army Lieutenant, killed in action (World War II)
iii. Richard von Weizsäcker (1920–2015), statesman (CDU) and President of Germany 1984–1994
(a). Robert Klaus von Weizsäcker (born 1954), professor of political economy, president of the German Chess Federation
(b). Andreas von Weizsäcker (1956–2008), professor of art
(c). Beatrice von Weizsäcker (born 1958), Jurisprudence graduate and freelance journalist
(d). Fritz von Weizsäcker (born 1960), professor of medicine
b. Viktor von Weizsäcker (1886–1957), neurologist
C. Julius Weizsäcker (1828–1889), historian
1. Julius Hugo Wilhelm Weizsäcker (1861–1939), lawyer
2. Heinrich Weizsäcker (1862–1945), professor of art history
a. Karl Hermann Wilhelm Weizsäcker (1898–1918)

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