Wikipedia:UCSF School of Medicine

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The School of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco and Wiki Project Med collaborate in presenting Wikipedia to health care practitioners, especially by encouraging medical students to edit Wikipedia as part of their coursework. This partnership began in 2013 as coordinated by Professor Amin Azzam, on Wikipedia as user:AminMDMA, and continues to the present (2016).

The School of Pharmacy at the University of California San Francisco began integrating Wikipedia editing into its curriculum in 2014. Professor Tina Brock as Wikipedia user:Tmpbrock, former Associate Dean of Global Health and Educational Innovations for the School of Pharmacy and now an adjunct professor at UCSF and Director of Pharmacy Education at Monash University and Dorie Apollonio as Wikipedia user:Health policy, lead pharmacy students in this effort as part of a required Health Policy course. Third year pharmacy students are assigned articles to edit from Wiki Project Pharmacology as a required part of their course. This capitalizes on skills from a prior required course in medicines information that all pharmacy students take in their second year.

Project history[edit]

"Editing Wikipedia for medical school credit", a poster exhibited at the November 2016 annual conference of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Most of the collaboration can be organized as projects associated with particular courses. Here is a history of the school of medicine courses:

Project outcomes[edit]

The UCSF student editing project continues today. The below summarizes the impact of the UCSF student efforts.

School of Medicine
Course Date Number of students Number of pages edited Days of active editing Number of edits during course Average views per page per day over course days Total views during course|
Nov-Dec 2013 5
5
28 days
176
3,279 459,071
April 2014 7
7
28 days
181
1,455 285,233
Nov 2014 16
16
28 days
727
513 229,761
Nov 2015 15
15
26 days
444
1,628 500,708
March 2016 7
1
28 days
347
2,536 71,016
Nov-Dec 2016 22
14
27 days
850
490 185,107
Feb-Mar 2017 8
7

850
236 246,000
School of Pharmacy
Course Date Number of students Number of pages edited Days of active editing Number of edits during course Average views per page per day over course days Total views during course|
Fall 2014 116
116
28 days
737
443 1,438,535
Fall 2015 125
31
28 days
2,350
667 579,000
Fall 2016 119
30
28 days
1,190
249 293,169

Media coverage[edit]

The UCSF student editing project has gotten as much media coverage as any other Wikimedia outreach project. The below sources are supporting evidence that there is public interest in learning about how medical students participate in Wikipedia and how this class can be a model for similar efforts.

Other presentations[edit]

SOP training materials and WikiEd dashboard as teaching tools

Participate[edit]

Userbox[edit]

⚕ This user participated in a medical editing session at UCSF.

Persons who have participated in the program may add the "UCSF editing" box to their userpage by adding the following template to their userpage after creating a Wikipedia account: {{User UCSF Editing}}

About the Wikipedia Education Program[edit]

"Editing Wikipedia articles on medicine", a classroom handout

The Wikipedia Education Program is a project to connect students and the Wikipedia community to share information together through Wikipedia. Background information is available at Wikipedia:Education program.

Partnerships with medical schools are important because Wikipedia has substantial coverage of the majority of medical topics. Wikipedia medical articles are highly trafficked: over 25,000 medicine articles receive almost 200 million views per month and nearly 8,000 pharmacology articles receive over 40 million views per month as shown at Wikipedia:WikiProject Medicine/Popular pages. Research supports Wikipedia's increasingly influential role as the dominant online reference in delivering medical information to the lay public—as well as being a frequently consulted resource for medical professionals. The Wikipedia article "Health information on Wikipedia" summarizes this, and for more information, see Wikipedia:WikiProject Medicine/Research publications for a list of academic studies of Wikipedia's health content.