Émile Bréhier

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Émile Bréhier (French: [bʁeje]; 12 April 1876, Bar-le-Duc – 3 February 1952, Paris) was a French philosopher. His interest was in classical philosophy, and the history of philosophy. He wrote a Histoire de la Philosophie, translated into English in seven volumes.

Bréhier was Henri Bergson's successor at the Sorbonne, in 1945. The historian Louis Bréhier was his brother.

Views[edit]

He was an early follower of Bergson; in the 1930s there was an influential view that Bergsonism and Neoplatonism were linked.[1]

He has been called "the sole figure in the French history who adopts an Hegelian interpretation of Neoplatonism",[2] but also a Neo-Kantian opponent of Hegel.[3]

Works[edit]

  • Schelling (1912)
  • Histoire de la philosophie allemande (1921)
  • La Philosophie de Plotin
  • Plotin: Ennéades (with French translation), Collection Budé, 1924–1938
  • Histoire de la philosophie - I Antiquité et moyen âge (three volumes), II La philosophie moderne (four volumes)
  • La philosophie du moyen âge (1949)
  • Le monde byzantin - la civilisation byzantine (1950)
  • Chrysippe et l'ancien stoïcisme (Paris, 1951)
  • Études de philosophie antique (1955)

References[edit]

  • Alan D. Schrift (2006), Twentieth-Century French Philosophy: Key Themes And Thinkers, p. 107

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Andrew Passavant, Jodi Dean, Empire's New Clothes: Reading Hardt and Negri (2004), p. 218.
  2. ^ http://classics.dal.ca/Faculty%20and%20Staff/Neoplatonism_and_Con.php; Hankey p. 120 in Jean-Marc Narbonne, W. J. Hankey, Levinas and the Greek Heritage & One Hundred Years of Neoplatonism in France (2006).
  3. ^ Bruce Baugh, French Hegel: From Surrealism to Postmodernism (2003), note p. 183.

External links[edit]