(86039) 1999 NC43

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(86039) 1999 NC43
Discovery[1]
Discovered by LINEAR (704)
Discovery date 14 July 1999
Designations
MPC designation (86039) 1999 NC43
Minor planet category Apollo NEO,
PHA[2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 2013-Nov-04
(Uncertainty=0)[2]
Aphelion 2.779 AU (Q)
Perihelion 0.7403 AU (q)
1.759 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.5792
2.33 yr
328.6° (M)
Inclination 7.124°
311.8°
120.6°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~2.2 kilometers (1.4 mi)[2]
~1.1 meters per second (2.5 miles per hour)
34.5 hr[2]
Albedo 0.14[2]
15.9[2]

(86039) 1999 NC43, provisionally known as 1999 NC43, is a near-Earth asteroid and potentially hazardous object.[2] It was discovered on 14 July 1999 by Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) at an apparent magnitude of 18 using a 1.0-meter (39 in) reflecting telescope.[1] It has a diameter of 2.2 kilometers (1.4 mi).[2] 1999 NC43 is suspected to be related to the Chelyabinsk meteor from 15 February 2013.[3][4]

1999 NC43 has a well-determined orbit with an uncertainty of 0.[2] It makes close approaches to Venus, Earth, and Mars.[5] Its most notable close approach to Earth will be on 14 February 2173 at a distance of 0.03361 AU (5,028,000 km; 3,124,000 mi).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 1999-O15 : 1999 NC43". IAU Minor Planet Center. 1999-07-19. Retrieved 2013-11-09.  (J99N43C)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 86039 (1999 NC43)" (last observation: 2013-08-03; arc: 14.15 years). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2013-11-09. 
  3. ^ Borovička, Jiří; Pavel Spurný, Peter Brown, Paul Wiegert, Pavel Kalenda, David Clark, Lukáš Shrbený (6 November 2013). "The trajectory, structure and origin of the Chelyabinsk asteroidal impactor". Nature. doi:10.1038/nature12671. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  4. ^ Schiermeier, Quirin. "Risk of massive asteroid strike underestimated". Nature News. Nature Publishing Group. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: 86039 (1999 NC43)" (last observation: 2013-08-03; arc: 14.15 years). Retrieved 2013-11-09. 

External links[edit]