100-man kumite

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100-man kumite (hyakunin kumite in Japanese) is an extreme test of physical and mental endurance in Kyokushin karate.[1] Kumite (sparring), one of the three main sections of karate training, involves simulated combat against an opponent. The 100-man kumite consists of 100 rounds of kumite, each between one-and-a-half and two minutes in length. Normally, the karate practitioner undergoing the test will have to face similarly or higher-ranked opponents, and may face an opponent a few times in the course of the test (depending on the number of opponents available to participate).

The challenge was devised by Masutatsu Oyama, the founder of Kyokushin and the first person to complete the test. He completed the 100-man kumite three times over three consecutive days.[1] The second man to complete the test was Steve Arneil in 1965.[1] In July 2004, Naomi Ali (née Woods) became the first woman to complete the 100-man kumite.[1] Variations using 20-man and 50-man challenges have also been employed.

Partial list of kumites[edit]

  1. Masutatsu Oyama (Japan)
  2. Steve Arneil (UK, May 21, 1965)
  3. Tadashi Nakamura (Japan, October 15, 1965)
  4. Shigeru Oyama (Japan, September 17, 1966)(120 in total)
  5. Loek Hollander (The Netherlands, August 5, 1967)
  6. John Jarvis (New Zealand, 1967)
  7. Howard Collins (United Kingdom, December 1, 1972)
  8. Miyuki Miura (Japan, April 13, 1973)
  9. Shokei Matsui (Japan, April 18, 1986)[2]
  10. Ademir da Costa (Brazil, April 25, 1987)
  11. Keiji Sampei (Japan, February 24, 1990)
  12. Akira Masuda (Japan, May 19, 1991)
  13. Kenji Yamaki (Japan, March 22, 1995)
  14. Francisco Filho (Brazil, March 22, 1995) [3]
  15. Hajime Kazumi (Japan, March 13, 1999)
  16. Naomi Woods (Australia, July 4, 2004)[1] (the first woman to ever perform the 100-man kumite)
  17. Arthur Hovhannisyan (March 29, 2009) [4]
  18. Judd Reid (Australia, October 22, 2011) [5]
  19. Tariel Nikoleishvili (Georgia, April 26, 2014) [6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]