101 Uses for a Dead Cat

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101 Uses for a Dead Cat
101UsesforDeadCat.jpg
Original cover
Author Simon Bond
Country United States
Genre Black comedy, Cartoons
Published 1981
ISBN 0-517-54516-0

101 Uses for a Dead Cat, by Simon Bond, was a bestselling collection of macabre cartoons. The book was promoted with the tag line, "Since time immemorial mankind has been plagued by the question, 'What do you do with a dead cat?'" It consisted of cartoons depicting the bodies of dead cats being used for various purposes, including anchoring boats, sharpening pencils and holding bottles of wine.

Release[edit]

First published in the UK in 1981 as A Hundred and One Uses of a Dead Cat,[1] the collection was eventually republished in 20 countries and sold over 2 million copies.[2] It spawned two sequels, 101 More Uses of a Dead Cat and Uses of a Dead Cat in History, as well as calendars featuring the cartoons and even a book in response called The Cat's Revenge - More Than 101 Uses for Dead People. In 2006, a 25th anniversary edition of A Hundred and One Uses of a Dead Cat was published with a new foreword.[2]

Reception[edit]

By December 7, 1981, it had spent 27 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list.[3] Its success was considered part of a larger "cat craze" in popular culture, which included the Jim Davis comic strip Garfield, and the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cats.[4]

Time called the author and illustrator, Simon Bond, "the Charles Addams of ailurophobia." He received hate mail accusing him of obscenity and sadism.[3]

American opinion stated that those who read the book should be "prepared to be disgusted or appalled from time to time".[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simon Bond: Cartoonist and illustrator best known for his book ‘101 Uses of a Dead Cat’. Retrieved 12 June 2012 from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/simon-bond-cartoonist-and-illustrator-best-known-for-his-book-lsquo101-uses-of-a-dead-catrsquo-2325838.html
  2. ^ a b 101 Uses for a Dead Cat. In Cartoonstock.. Retrieved 14 September 2010 from http://www.cartoonstock.com/101_dead_cats/index.htm
  3. ^ a b "A Comeuppance for Cats". Time. 21 September 1981. Retrieved 9 June 2010. 
  4. ^ Hinckley, David (2 August 1981). "Light Feet: The Surge of Cat Books Is What the Veterinarian Ordered For America". St. Petersburg Independent. pp. 2–B. Retrieved 9 June 2010. 
  5. ^ American opinion, Vol. 25. Robert Welch, Inc. 1982. p. 64.