1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

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1999 NCAA Men's Division I
Basketball Tournament
1999 Final Four logo.png
1999 Final Four logo
Season 1998–99
Teams 64
Finals site Tropicana Field
St. Petersburg, Florida
Champions Connecticut (1st title)
Runner-up Duke (8th title game)
Semifinalists Michigan State (3rd Final Four)
Ohio State (Vacated) (9th Final Four)
Winning coach Jim Calhoun (1st title)
MOP Richard Hamilton Connecticut
Attendance 720,685
Top scorer Richard Hamilton Connecticut
(145 points)
NCAA Men's Division I Tournaments
«1998 2000»

The 1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1999, and ended with the championship game on March 29 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. A total of 63 games were played. This year's Final Four was the first—and so far, only—to be held in a baseball-specific facility, as Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays (then known as the Devil Rays).

The Final Four consisted of Connecticut, making their first ever Final Four appearance, Ohio State, making their ninth Final Four appearance and first since 1968, Michigan State, making their third Final Four appearance and first since their 1979 national championship, and Duke, the overall number one seed and making their first Final Four appearance since losing the national championship game in 1994.

In the national championship game, Connecticut defeated Duke 77-74 to win their first ever national championship, snapping Duke's 32-game winning streak. Duke nonetheless tied the record for most games won during a single season, with 37, which they co-held until Kentucky's 38-win season in 2011-2012(The 2007-08 Memphis team actually broke this record first, but the team was later forced to forfeit their entire season due to eligibility issues surrounding the team).

Richard "Rip" Hamilton of Connecticut was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was a significant victory for the program, as it cemented Connecticut's reputation as a true basketball power after decades of barely missing the Final Four.

This tournament is also historically notable as the coming-out party for Gonzaga as a rising mid-major power. The Bulldogs became the nation's basketball darlings during a run to the West Regional final in which they defeated three major-conference powers, including 1998 Final Four participant Stanford, and took UConn literally to the last minute before losing. Gonzaga has made every NCAA tournament since then, and is now generally considered to be a high-major program despite its mid-major conference affiliation.

Due to violations committed by Ohio State head coach Jim O'Brien, the Buckeyes were forced to vacate their appearance in the 1999 Final Four.[1]

Locations[edit]

First and Second Rounds[edit]

Later Rounds[edit]

Region Site
East East Rutherford, New Jersey (Continental Airlines Arena)
Midwest St. Louis, Missouri (Trans World Dome)
South Knoxville, Tennessee (Thompson–Boling Arena)
West Phoenix, Arizona (America West Arena)
Finals St. Petersburg, Florida (Tropicana Field)

Teams[edit]

Region Seed Team Coach Finished Final Opponent Score
East
East 1 Duke Mike Krzyzewski Runner Up 1 Connecticut L 77-74
East 2 Miami Leonard Hamilton Round of 32 10 Purdue L 73-63
East 3 Cincinnati Bob Huggins Round of 32 6 Temple L 64-54
East 4 Tennessee Jerry Green Round of 32 12 Southwest Missouri State L 81-51
East 5 Wisconsin Dick Bennett Round of 64 12 Southwest Missouri State L 43-32
East 6 Temple John Chaney Regional Runner-up 1 Duke L 85-64
East 7 Texas Rick Barnes Round of 64 10 Purdue L 58-54
East 8 College of Charleston John Kresse Round of 64 9 Tulsa L 62-53
East 9 Tulsa Bill Self Round of 32 1 Duke L 97-56
East 10 Purdue Gene Keady Sweet Sixteen 6 Temple L 77-55
East 11 Kent State Gary Waters Round of 64 6 Temple L 61-54
East 12 Southwest Missouri State Steve Alford Sweet Sixteen 1 Duke L 78-61
East 13 Delaware Mike Brey Round of 64 4 Tennessee L 62-52
East 14 George Mason Jim Larranaga Round of 64 3 Cincinnati L 72-48
East 15 Lafayette Fran O'Hanlon Round of 64 2 Miami, Florida L 75-54
East 16 Florida A&M Mickey Clayton Round of 64 1 Duke L 99-58
Midwest
Midwest 1 Michigan State Tom Izzo National Semifinals 1 Duke L 68-62
Midwest 2 Utah Rick Majerus Round of 32 10 Miami, Ohio L 66-58
Midwest 3 Kentucky Tubby Smith Regional Runner-up 1 Michigan State L 73-66
Midwest 4 Arizona Lute Olson Round of 64 13 Oklahoma L 61-60
Midwest 5 Charlotte Bobby Lutz Round of 32 13 Oklahoma L 85-72
Midwest 6 Kansas Roy Williams Round of 32 3 Kentucky L 92-88
Midwest 7 Washington Bob Bender Round of 64 10 Miami, Ohio L 59-58
Midwest 8 Villanova Steve Lappas Round of 64 9 Mississippi L 72-70
Midwest 9 Ole Miss Rod Barnes Round of 32 1 Michigan State L 74-66
Midwest 10 Miami, Ohio Charlie Coles Sweet Sixteen 3 Kentucky L 58-43
Midwest 11 Evansville Jim Crews Round of 64 6 Kansas L 95-74
Midwest 12 Rhode Island Jim Harrick Round of 64 5 Charlotte L 81-70
Midwest 13 Oklahoma Kelvin Sampson Sweet Sixteen 1 Michigan State L 54-46
Midwest 14 New Mexico State Lou Henson Round of 64 3 Kentucky L 82-60
Midwest 15 Arkansas State Dickey Nutt Round of 64 2 Utah L 80-58
Midwest 16 Mount St. Mary's Jim Phelan Round of 64 1 Michigan State L 76-53
South
South 1 Auburn Cliff Ellis Sweet Sixteen 4 Ohio State L 72-64
South 2 Maryland Gary Williams Sweet Sixteen 3 St. John's L 76-62
South 3 St. John's Mike Jarvis Regional Runner-up 4 Ohio State L 77-74
South 4 Ohio State (Vacated) Jim O'Brien National Semifinals 1 Connecticut L 64-58
South 5 UCLA (Vacated) Steve Lavin Round of 64 12 Detroit L 56-53
South 6 Indiana Bob Knight Round of 32 3 St. John's L 86-61
South 7 Louisville Denny Crum Round of 64 10 Creighton L 62-58
South 8 Syracuse Jim Boeheim Round of 64 9 Oklahoma State L 69-61
South 9 Oklahoma State Eddie Sutton Round of 32 1 Auburn L 81-74
South 10 Creighton Dana Altman Round of 32 2 Maryland L 75-63
South 11 George Washington Tom Penders Round of 64 6 Indiana L 108-88
South 12 Detroit Perry Watson Round of 32 4 Ohio State L 75-44
South 13 Murray State Tevester Anderson Round of 64 4 Ohio State L 72-58
South 14 Samford Jimmy Tillette Round of 64 3 St. John's L 69-43
South 15 Valparaiso Homer Drew Round of 64 2 Maryland L 82-60
South 16 Winthrop Gregg Marshall Round of 64 1 Auburn L 80-41
West
West 1 Connecticut Jim Calhoun Champion 1 Duke W 77-74
West 2 Stanford Mike Montgomery Round of 32 10 Gonzaga L 82-74
West 3 North Carolina Bill Guthridge Round of 64 14 Weber State L 76-74
West 4 Arkansas Nolan Richardson Round of 32 5 Iowa L 82-72
West 5 Iowa Tom Davis Sweet Sixteen 1 Connecticut L 78-68
West 6 Florida Billy Donovan Sweet Sixteen 10 Gonzaga L 73-72
West 7 Minnesota Clem Haskins Round of 64 10 Gonzaga L 75-63
West 8 Missouri Norm Stewart Round of 64 9 New Mexico L 61-59
West 9 New Mexico Dave Bliss Round of 32 1 Connecticut L 78-56
West 10 Gonzaga Dan Monson Regional Runner-up 1 Connecticut L 67-62
West 11 Penn Fran Dunphy Round of 64 6 Florida L 75-61
West 12 UAB Murry Bartow Round of 64 5 Iowa L 77-64
West 13 Siena Paul Hewitt Round of 64 4 Arkansas L 94-80
West 14 Weber State Ron Abegglen Round of 32 6 Florida L 82-74
West 15 Alcorn State Davey Whitney Round of 64 2 Stanford L 69-57
West 16 Texas-San Antonio Tim Carter Round of 64 1 Connecticut L 91-66

Bids by conference[edit]

Bids by Conference
Bids Conference(s)
7 Big Ten
6 SEC
5 Big 12, Big East
4 C-USA, Pac-10
3 Atlantic 10, ACC, Missouri Valley, WAC
2 Mid-American
1 19 others

Bracket[edit]

East Regional - East Rutherford, New Jersey[edit]

Round of 16 Quarterfinals Regional Semifinals Regional Finals
                       
1 Duke 99
16 Florida A&M 58
1 Duke 97
Charlotte
9 Tulsa 56
8 College of Charleston 53
9 Tulsa 62
1 Duke 78
12 SW Missouri St. 61
5 Wisconsin 32
12 SW Missouri St. 43
12 SW Missouri St. 81
Charlotte
4 Tennessee 51
4 Tennessee 62
13 Delaware 52
1 Duke 85
6 Temple 64
6 Temple 61
11 Kent St. 54
6 Temple 64
Boston
3 Cincinnati 54
3 Cincinnati 72
14 George Mason 48
6 Temple 77
10 Purdue 55
7 Texas 54
10 Purdue 58
10 Purdue 73
Boston
2 Miami-FL 63
2 Miami-FL 75
15 Lafayette 54

Regional Final Summary[edit]

CBS
Sunday, March 21
#1 Duke Blue Devils 85, #6 Temple Owls 64
Pts: T. Langdon - 23
Rebs: E. Brand - 8
Asts: C. Carrawell - 7
Pts: L. Barnes, M. Karcher - 19
Rebs: L. Barnes - 8
Asts: P. Sanchez - 4
Halftime Score: Duke, 43-31
Continental Airlines Arena - East Rutherford, NJ
Attendance: 19,557
Referees: Frankie Bourdeaux, Ted Valentine, Scott Thornley

Midwest Regional - St. Louis, Missouri[edit]

Round of 16 Quarterfinals Regional Semifinals Regional Finals
                       
1 Michigan State 76
16 Mount St. Mary's 53
1 Michigan State 74
Milwaukee
9 Ole Miss 66
8 Villanova 70
9 Ole Miss 72
1 Michigan State 54
13 Oklahoma 46
5 Charlotte 81
12 Rhode Island 70
5 Charlotte 72
Milwaukee
13 Oklahoma 85
4 Arizona 60
13 Oklahoma 61
1 Michigan State 73
3 Kentucky 66
6 Kansas 95
11 Evansville 74
6 Kansas 88
New Orleans
3 Kentucky 92*
3 Kentucky 82
14 New Mexico State 60
3 Kentucky 58
10 Miami-OH 43
7 Washington 58
10 Miami-OH 59
10 Miami-OH 66
New Orleans
2 Utah 58
2 Utah 80
15 Arkansas State 58

Regional Final Summary[edit]

CBS
Sunday, March 21
#1 Michigan State Spartans 73, #3 Kentucky 66
Pts: M. Peterson - 19
Rebs: M. Peterson - 10
Asts: M. Cleaves - 7
Pts: H. Evans, T. Prince - 12
Rebs: H. Evans - 6
Asts: W. Turner - 8
Halftime Score: Kentucky, 36-35
Trans World Dome - St. Louis, MO
Attendance: 42,519
Referees: Jim Burr, Bob Donato, Reggie Greenwood

South Regional - Knoxville, Tennessee[edit]

Round of 16 Quarterfinals Regional Semifinals Regional Finals
                       
1 Auburn 80
16 Winthrop 41
1 Auburn 81
Indianapolis
9 Oklahoma State 74
8 Syracuse 61
9 Oklahoma State 69
1 Auburn 63
4 Ohio State 72
5 UCLA 53
12 Detroit 56
12 Detroit 44
Indianapolis
4 Ohio State 75
4 Ohio State 72
13 Murray State 58
4 Ohio State 77
3 St. John's 74
6 Indiana 108
11 George Washington 88
6 Indiana 61
Orlando
3 St. John's 86
3 St. John's 69
14 Samford 43
3 St. John's 76
2 Maryland 62
7 Louisville 58
10 Creighton 62
10 Creighton 63
Orlando
2 Maryland 75
2 Maryland 82
15 Valparaiso 60

Regional Final Summary[edit]

CBS
Saturday, March 20
#4 Ohio State Buckeyes 77, #3 St. John's Red Storm 74
Pts: S. Penn - 22
Rebs: S. Penn - 8
Asts: S. Penn - 8
Pts: L. Postell - 24
Rebs: L. Postell, R. Artest - 9
Asts: E. Barkley - 7
Halftime Score: Ohio State, 41-33
Thompson-Boling Arena - Knoxville, TN
Attendance: 24,248
Referees: Dave Libbey, Gene Monje, Mark Whitehead

West Regional - Phoenix, Arizona[edit]

Round of 16 Quarterfinals Regional Semifinals Regional Finals
                       
1 Connecticut 91
16 Texas-San Antonio 66
1 Connecticut 78
Denver
9 New Mexico 56
8 Missouri 59
9 New Mexico 61
1 Connecticut 78
5 Iowa 68
5 Iowa 77
12 UAB 64
5 Iowa 82
Denver
4 Arkansas 72
4 Arkansas 94
13 Siena 80
1 Connecticut 67
10 Gonzaga 62
6 Florida 75
11 Pennsylvania 61
6 Florida 82
Seattle
14 Weber State 74*
3 North Carolina 74
14 Weber State 76
6 Florida 72
10 Gonzaga 73
7 Minnesota 63
10 Gonzaga 75
10 Gonzaga 82
Seattle
2 Stanford 74
2 Stanford 69
15 Alcorn State 57

Regional Final Summary[edit]

CBS
Saturday, March 20
#1 Connecticut Huskies 67, #10 Gonzaga 62
Pts: R. Hamilton - 21
Rebs: K. Freeman - 15
Asts: K. El-Amin - 4
Pts: Q. Hall - 18
Rebs: Q. Hall, C. Calvary - 8
Asts: M. Santangelo, R. Floyd, R. Frahm - 2
Halftime Score: Gonzaga, 32-31
America West Arena - Phoenix, AZ
Attendance: 18,053
Referees: Mike Patterson, Larry Rose, Bobby Hunt

Final Four[edit]

St. Petersburg, FL[edit]

National Semifinals National Championship Game
           
E1 Duke 68
M1 Michigan State 62
E1 Duke 74
W1 Connecticut 77
S4 Ohio State 58
W1 Connecticut 64

Game Summaries[edit]

Final Four[edit]

CBS
March 27
5:00 pm
#1 Connecticut Huskies 64, #4 Ohio State Buckeyes 58
Pts: R. Hamilton 24
Rebs: Ricky Moore 8
Asts: K. El-Amin 6
Pts: M. Redd 15
Rebs: M. Redd 8
Asts: J. Singleton, S. Penn 4
Halftime Score: Connecticut, 36-35
Tropicana Field - St. Petersburg, FL
Attendance: 41,340
Referees: Jim Burr, Larry Rose, Mark Whitehead
CBS
March 27
8:00 pm
#1 Duke Blue Devils 68, #1 Michigan State Spartans 62
Pts: E. Brand 18
Rebs: E. Brand 15
Asts: T. Langdon 3
Pts: M. Peterson 15
Rebs: A. Smith 10
Asts: M. Cleaves 10
Halftime Score: Duke, 32-20
Tropicana Field - St. Petersburg, FL
Attendance: 41,340
Referees: Dave Libbey, Curtis Shaw, John Cahill

National Championship[edit]

CBS
March 29
9:00 pm
#1 Connecticut Huskies 77, #1 Duke Blue Devils 74
Pts: R. Hamilton 27
Rebs: Ricky Moore, K. Freeman 8
Asts: K. El-Amin 4
Pts: T. Langdon 25
Rebs: E. Brand 13
Asts: W. Avery 5
Halftime Score: Duke, 39-37
Tropicana Field - St. Petersburg, FL
Attendance: 41,340
Referees: Tim Higgins, Gerald Boudreaux, Scott Thornley

Announcers[edit]

Additional Notes[edit]

  • Despite their loss in the finals to Connecticut, the 1998-1999 Duke team won 37 games.[2] This tied them with Duke's 1985–86 team, UNLV's 1986–87 squad, and later, Illinois' 2004–05 team and Kansas's 2007–08 team, for the most wins in a season, until their record was broken by the 38-win Memphis team in 2007-08. However, as the NCAA vacated Memphis' 2007-2008 season due to the ineligibility of Derrick Rose, they reclaimed the 37-win record. The mark would once again be raised to 38 wins after Kentucky's dominant title run in 2012. Interestingly, only one of the first 5 teams to be the winningest single-season teams won a national championship; UNLV's squad lost in the national semifinal to Indiana, and the other teams lost in the finals, to Louisville, UConn, and North Carolina, while Kansas defeated Memphis in the 2008 national championship game.
  • Connecticut's victory in the finals marks the biggest upset in Championship Game history in the NCAA Tournament, as they were 9.5-point underdogs in the contest despite having compiled a 33-2 record going into the Championship game, including a 14-2 record in the tough Big East Conference. In fact, Connecticut had spent more weeks as the number 1 team in the country, according to the AP Top 25 Poll, than had Duke. The previous record was held by Villanova, who defeated Georgetown as 9-point underdogs in 1985. [3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jim O'Brien - Firing controversy (references included)
  2. ^ "Men's College Basketball 1998 - 1999 Chi Square Linear WL - SD". Archived from the original on 2009-05-13. Retrieved 2009-04-06. 
  3. ^ "Gold Sheet College Basketball Log". Archived from the original on 10 April 2010. Retrieved 29 March 2010.