2004 JG6

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2004 JG6
Discovery
Discovered by Brian A. Skiff / LONEOS
Discovery date May 11, 2004
Designations
none
Minor planet category Aten, Apohele,
Mercury-crosser,
Venus-crosser
Orbital characteristics
Epoch October 22, 2004 (JD 2453300.5)
Aphelion 145.491 Gm (0.973 AU)
Perihelion 44.480 Gm (0.297 AU)
94.985 Gm (0.635 AU)
Eccentricity 0.532
184.798 d (0.51 a)
34.58 km/s
164.532°
Inclination 18.962°
37.076°
352.935°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.5-1.1 km[1]
Mass 1.3-18.0×1011 kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
0.0001-0.0003 m/s²
0.0003-0.0006 km/s
? d
Albedo 0.10?
Temperature ~349 K
Spectral type
?
18.9

2004 JG6 (also written 2004 JG6) is one of the closest orbiting objects to the Sun.

It is the second known Apohele asteroid (the first being 163693 Atira), which means its entire orbit lies within that of the Earth.[2] Its orbital period is less than that of Venus, making it one of the closest known objects to the Sun, after Mercury. 2004 JG6 has an eccentric orbit that crosses the orbits of both Mercury and Venus.[2]

It was discovered by Brian A. Skiff of the LONEOS project.

References[edit]

  1. ^ NEODyS
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2004 JG6)" (2012-06-10 last obs (arc=8 years)). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 

External links[edit]