651 Antikleia

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651 Antikleia
Discovery[1]
Discovered by August Kopff
Discovery site Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory
Discovery date October 4, 1907
Designations
MPC designation 651
Named after
Anticlea
1907 AN
Minor planet category Main belt [2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch November 30, 2008
Aphelion 3.3185 AU
Perihelion 2.7319 AU
3.02523 AU
Eccentricity 0.09695
1921.93 days (5.26 years)
86.86°
Inclination 10.767°
38.203°
355.742°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 33.04 ± 2.2 km (20.53 ± 1.37 mi)
Mean diameter[4]

20.291 ± 0.003 hours [5]

20.287 ± 0.004 hours [6]
Albedo 0.1603 ± 0.024 [4]
10.01 [7]

651 Antikleia is a main-belt asteroid discovered on October 4, 1907 by August Kopff at the Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory.[1] It is named for Anticlea the mother of Odysseus.[8]

This is a member of the dynamic Eos family of asteroids that most likely formed as the result of a collisional breakup of a parent body.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 17, 2008. 
  2. ^ "651 Antikleia (1907 AN)". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved December 28, 2008. 
  3. ^ "(651) Antikleia". AstDyS. Italy: University of Pisa. Retrieved December 17, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b Tedesco, Edward F.; Noah, Paul V.; Noah, Meg; Price, Stephan D. (2004). "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey (SIMPS)". IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Planetary Data System. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  5. ^ Galád, Adrián; Kornoš, Leonard (2008). "A Collection of Lightcurves from Modra: 2007 December- 2008 June". The Minor Planet Bulletin 35 (4): 144–146. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..144G. 
  6. ^ Sada, Pedro V.; Canizales, Eder D.; Armada, Edgar M. (2005). "CCD photometry of asteroids 651 Antikleia, 738 Alagasta, and 2151 Hadwiger using a remote commercial telescope". The Minor Planet Bulletin 32 (4): 73–75. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...73S. 
  7. ^ Tholen, David J., ed. (2007). "Asteroid Absolute Magnitudes and Slopes". EAR-A-5-DDR-ASTERMAG-V12.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on 1 December 2008. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  8. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names (fifth ed.). Germany: Springer. p. 64. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  9. ^ Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F. (March 1995). "Eos, Koronis, and Maria family asteroids: Infrared (JHK) photometry". Icarus 114: 186–196. Bibcode:1995Icar..114..186V. doi:10.1006/icar.1995.1053. CiteSeerX: 10.1.1.31.2739.