Aegiphila sellowiana

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Aegiphila sellowiana
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Aegiphila
Species: A. sellowiana
Binomial name
Aegiphila sellowiana
Cham.

Aegiphila sellowiana is a species of tree[1] or shrub[2] in the family Lamiaceae.[3] It is native to Bolivia, Brazil, and Ecuador.[4] Its common names include tamanqueira.[5]

In tree form it can grow seven meters tall. It produces oppositely arranged leaves up to 28 centimeters long and abundant drupes.[6] The seeds are dispersed by birds that eat the fruits.[7]

It often grows in riparian zones, where it tolerates flooding.[1] It is a pioneer species sometimes used in revegetation efforts in riparian habitat in Brazil.[6]

The soft wood has been used to make furniture and shoes.[6] It has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine as an antivenom and anti-inflammatory.[5]

This species is cited in Flora Brasiliensis by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Medri, C., et al. (2011). Genetic diversity and flooding survival in Aegiphila sellowiana (Lamiaceae), a typical tree species from upland riparian forests. Genetics and Molecular Research 10(2), 1084-91.
  2. ^ Aegiphila sellowiana. Flora of Bolivia.
  3. ^ França, F. and A. M. Giulietti. (2012). Lectotypifications, neotypifications, and epitypification in the genus Aegiphila Jacq. Neodiversity 6 1-14.
  4. ^ Aegiphila sellowiana, distribution. Tropicos.
  5. ^ a b Ferreira, M. A., et al. (2010). Antimicrobial activity of Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Lamiaceae, against oral pathogens. Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia 20(2), 246-49.
  6. ^ a b c Ruas, E. A., et al. (2011). Isolation and characterization of eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci in Aegiphila sellowiana and their transferability. Biologia Plantarum 55(2), 396-99.
  7. ^ Medri, C., et al. (2011). Population genetic structure of the tropical tree species Aegiphila sellowiana (Lamiaceae). Genetics and Molecular Research 10(4), 3186-98.

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