Alice Feiring

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Alice Feiring is an American journalist and author, for several years a wine and travel columnist for Time magazine,[1] and known as an advocate for "natural wine".[2] In addition to contributions to publications such as The New York Times, New York Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, LA Times, Condé Nast Traveler and Forbes Traveler, her blog "The Feiring Line" (formerly: "Veritas in Vino") has been rated among America's leading wine blogs,[3] and her voice described by Mike Steinberger as part of a new wave of "real flowering of high-quality wine journalism".[4] In 2011, Feiring was selected as "Online Wine Writer of the Year" by the Louis Roederer International Wine Writer Awards.[5]

Her first book, published in May 2008,[6] The Battle for Wine and Love: Or How I Saved the World from Parkerization, described as "an opinionated look at the fight to preserve authenticity and diversity in wine",[4] due to its perceived "declaration of war" against critic Robert Parker found some controversy well before its date of release.[7][8] Reviewing the book, Eric Asimov later wrote, "Ms. Feiring is an uncompromising judge of wine and people who can no more stomach a lover’s preference for a wine she abhors than she can the presence of a microwave in her kitchen."[9]

Feiring's critical statements against California wine as "overblown, over-alcoholed, over-oaked, overpriced and over-manipulated"[10] have also sparked controversy.[11][12][13]

An article Feiring wrote for The Upgrader on Men.Style.com, online site of GQ and Details, titled "The Ten Most Overrated Wines in the World", which listed Bordeaux Garagistes, Australian Shiraz, Marlborough Sauvignon blanc, Super-Tuscans, Clos de Vougeot, Long Island wine, Albariño, Screaming Eagle, Sea Smoke Pinot noir and Chilean Cabernet,[14] chiefly drew response from defenders of Long Island wine.[15]

Feiring's second book, Naked Wine: Letting Grapes Do What Comes Naturally, was published in September, 2011.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butts, Mickey, Food & Wine (October 2005). "Seven Best Wine Blogs". 
  2. ^ Feiring, Alice, Time (August 13, 2006). "Au Naturel". 
  3. ^ Marcus, Lawrence, Food & Wine (October 2005). "Niche Wine Blogs". 
  4. ^ a b Steinberger, Mike, The World of Fine Wine (March 2008). "Everyone a Critic. The Future of Wine Writing" (PDF). 
  5. ^ Louis Roederer International Wine Writer Awards Winners 2011
  6. ^ Publishers Weekly (March 24, 2008). "Nonfiction Reviews: The Battle for Wine and Love: Or, How I Saved the World from Parkerization". 
  7. ^ Johnson, Richard, New York Post (February 13, 2008). "Critic Blamed for 'Raspy' Wine". 
  8. ^ Hellman, Peter, The New York Sun (May 7, 2008). "Food Blogger Takes on the Biggest Name in Wine: Robert Parker". 
  9. ^ Asimov, Eric, The New York Times (May 21, 2008). "Good Wine Reading With Mellow Aftertaste". 
  10. ^ Feiring, Alice, LA Times (May 5, 2008). "California wine? Down the drain". Los Angeles Times. 
  11. ^ Gordon, Jim, Wine Enthusiast (May 8, 2008). "What’s Behind the California Wine Bashing?". 
  12. ^ DeBord, Matthew, LA Times (May 12, 2008). "Terroir-izing California wine". Los Angeles Times. 
  13. ^ Mackay, Jordan, Chow (June 11, 2008). California Terroir: Wines that taste like they’re from somewhere
  14. ^ Feiring, Alice, GQ (November 14, 2007). The Ten Most Overrated Wines in the World
  15. ^ Thompson, Lenn, lenndevours.com (November 14, 2007). I Guess Alice Feiring Doesn't Like Long Island Wine...Or Hasn't Tasted Much of It
  16. ^ Publishers Weekly (September 5, 2011). "Nonfiction Reviews: Naked Wine". 

External links[edit]