Andrea da Barberino

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Andrea Mangiabotti,[1] called Andrea da Barberino (c. 1370–1431[2]) was an Italian writer and cantastorie ("storyteller")[3] of the Quattrocento Renaissance. He was born in Barberino Val d'Elsa, near Florence and lived in Florence.[1] He is principally known for his prose romance Il Guerrin Meschino, his I Reali di Francia ("The Royal House of France"[3]), a prose compilation (in the form of a chronicle[3]) of the Matter of France romance material concerning Charlemagne and Roland (Orlandino) from various legends and chansons de geste, and for his Aspramonte, a reworking of the chanson de geste Aspremont, which also features the hero Ruggiero.[2] His works, which circulated at first in manuscript, were extremely successful and popular,[1] and were a key source of material for later Italian romance writers, such as Luigi Pulci (Morgante), Matteo Maria Boiardo (Orlando Innamorato) and Ludovico Ariosto (Orlando Furioso).

Works[edit]

Andrea da Barberino wrote the following works:[1]

  • I Reali di Francia ("The Royal House of France")
  • Il Guerrin Meschino
  • Ajolfo del Barbicone (reworking of the French Aiol)
  • Ugone d'Alvernia (adaptation of the Franco-Italian chanson de geste Huon d'Auvergne, with the first chapter of the final book alternating terza rima and prose in the published edition)
  • Storie Nerbonesi (prose adaptation on the Old French chanson de geste Narbonnais and eight other chansons concerning Aymeri de Narbonne and Guillaume d'Orange)
  • [Le Storie d']Aspramonte (adaptation of the Old French chanson de geste Aspremont
  • Ansuigi (possibly also by Andrea)[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Geneviève Hasenohr and Michel Zink, eds. Dictionnaire des lettres françaises: Le Moyen Age. Collection: La Pochothèque. (Paris: Fayard, 1992. ISBN 2-253-05662-6), pp. 62–63.
  2. ^ a b The Cambridge History of Italian Literature, Peter Brand and Lino Pertile, eds. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p. 168.
  3. ^ a b c Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso, translated with an introduction by Barbara Reynolds (London: Penguin Books, 1975), Part I, Introduction, p. 58.
  4. ^ Gloria Allaire, Andrea da Barberino and the Language of Chivalry (Gainesville, FL: UP of Florida, 1997).

External links[edit]