Aram J. Pothier

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Aram J. Pothier
AramPothier.jpg
55th Governor of Rhode Island
In office
January 6, 1925 – February 4, 1928
Lieutenant Nathaniel W. Smith
Norman S. Case
Preceded by William S. Flynn
Succeeded by Norman S. Case
51st Governor of Rhode Island
In office
January 5, 1909 – January 5, 1915
Lieutenant Arthur Dennis
Zenas W. Bliss
Rosewell Burchard
Preceded by James H. Higgins
Succeeded by Robert Livingston Beeckman
Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island
In office
1897–1898
Governor Elisha Dyer, Jr.
Preceded by Edwin Allen
Succeeded by William Gregory
Personal details
Born (1854-07-26)July 26, 1854
Quebec, Canada
Died February 4, 1928(1928-02-04) (aged 73)
Woonsocket, Rhode Island, USA
Resting place Precious Blood Cemetery
Woonsocket, Rhode Island
Nationality French Canadian
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Françoise de Charmigny
Relations Zacharie Cloutier
Parents Jules Pothier
Domiltilde (Dallaire) Pothier
Residence Woonsocket, Rhode Island
Alma mater Nicolet College
Profession Banker
Politician

Aram Jules Pothier (July 26, 1854 – February 4, 1928) was an American banker and politician of French Canadian descent. He served as the 51st and 55th Governor of Rhode Island.

Early life[edit]

Pothier was born Quebec, Canada, the son of Jules Pothier and Domiltilde (Dallaire) Pothier.[1][2] He attended the common schools in Canada and graduated from Nicolet College in Quebec.[3] At the time of his graduation, his parents had already moved to Woonsocket, Rhode Island and he moved to Woonsocket to join them. He was a clerk for former Congressman Latimer W. Ballou at the Woonsocket Institute for Savings.[4]

Political career[edit]

He began his political career in 1885 as a Republican member of the Woonsocket School Committee.[5] He was appointed by Governor Taft to the 1889 Paris Exposition.[6] Pothier was a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1887 to 1888,[7] and served as city auditor from 1889 to 1894.

He was mayor of Woonsocket from 1894 to 1895, and declined renomination.[8] From 1897 to 1898 he served as Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island, during the first year that Elisha Dyer, Jr. was governor.[9] After his term as lieutenant governor, he retired from public office, but returned as a member of the Rhode Island Board of Education in 1907. Governor Dyer appointed him to the 1900 Paris Exhibition.[10]

Pothier was elected Governor of Rhode Island in 1908 and entered into service on January 5, 1909. He was reelected to three more one-year terms. At that time, biennial elections replaced annual elections for state officials, and Pothier won the first election for a two-year term as governor in 1912. He retired after this term, on January 5, 1915, when he was succeeded by fellow Republican Robert Livingston Beeckman.[11] In 1915, retiring from politics, he became President of the Woonsocket Institute for Savings and the Providence Union Trust Company.[12] He was again drafted by the Republican Party to run for governor in 1924.[13] He won that election and reelection in 1926, serving from January 6, 1925 until his death on February 4, 1928.[14] He was the first Rhode Island governor of French Canadian descent.

Death and legacy[edit]

He died on February 4, 1928 in Woonsocket and is interred in Precious Blood Cemetery in Woonsocket.[15][16]

In 2010, he was inducted into the American-French Genealogical Society Hall of Fame.[17]

Family life[edit]

Pothier met his wife Françoise de Charmigny in Paris at the 1900 Paris Exhibition. They were married in 1902 in Bridgeport, Connecticut.[18] He is a descendant of Zacharie Cloutier.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 
  2. ^ Find a Grave, Aram J. Pothier. This source states February 3 as date of death, while other sources states February 4.
  3. ^ Rhode Island Board of Education (1921). Annual Report of the State Board of Education: 1st- Together with the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education of Rhode Island. Rhode Island Board of Education. p. 103. 
  4. ^ "History of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 
  5. ^ Rhode Island Board of Education (1921). Annual Report of the State Board of Education: 1st- Together with the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education of Rhode Island. Rhode Island Board of Education. p. 103. 
  6. ^ Rhode Island. Board of Education (1921). Annual Report of the State Board of Education: 1st- Together with the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education of Rhode Island. Rhode Island. Board of Education. p. 103. 
  7. ^ Rhode Island. Dept. of State (1912). Manual, with Rules and Orders, for the Use of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island Department of State. p. 385. 
  8. ^ Rhode Island. Board of Education (1921). Annual Report of the State Board of Education: 1st- Together with the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education of Rhode Island. Rhode Island. Board of Education. p. 103. 
  9. ^ Rhode Island. Dept. of State (1912). Manual, with Rules and Orders, for the Use of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island Department of State. p. 385. 
  10. ^ "History of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 
  11. ^ Rhode Island. Board of Education (1921). Annual Report of the State Board of Education: 1st- Together with the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education of Rhode Island. Rhode Island. Board of Education. p. 103. 
  12. ^ Bradford-Rhodes & Company (1913). The Bankers Magazine, Volume 86. Bradford-Rhodes & Company. p. 191. 
  13. ^ Federal Writer's Project. Rhode Island (1937). Rhode Island: A Guide to the Smallest State. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 58. 
  14. ^ Capace, Nancy (2001). The Encyclopedia of Rhode Island. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 87. 
  15. ^ Find a Grave, Aram J. Pothier.
  16. ^ "Rhode Island Presidents & Governors Graves of Governors Continued". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 
  17. ^ "American-French Genealogical Society AFGS French Canadian Hall of Fame". American-French Genealogical Society. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Newport Mercury". Newport Mercury. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]


Political offices
Preceded by
Edwin Allen
Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island
1897–1898
Succeeded by
William Gregory
Preceded by
James H. Higgins
Governor of Rhode Island
1909–1915
Succeeded by
Robert Livingston Beeckman
Preceded by
William S. Flynn
Governor of Rhode Island
1925–1928
Succeeded by
Norman S. Case