Arthur Agatston

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Arthur Agatston (born 1947) is an American cardiologist best known as the developer of the South Beach Diet, but also the author of many published scholarly papers in the field of noninvasive cardiac diagnostics. His scientific research led to the Agatston Method and the Agatston Score for measuring coronary artery calcium.[1]

Education[edit]

Agatston earned an MD at New York University School of Medicine in 1973,[2] studied internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed his cardiology fellowship at NYU.[3]

Career[edit]

Dr. Agatston started his medical career on staff at New York University Medical Center. After a year, he took a position at the Mount Sinai Medical Center & Miami Heart Institute in Miami Beach, Florida where he later became director of the Non-Invasive Cardiac lab. He currently serves as the Medical Director, Wellness & Prevention at Baptist Health South Florida and practices at South Beach Preventive Cardiology.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arthur Agatston, MD". Webmd.com. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  2. ^ NYU Medical Center Office of Public Affairs (2007-05-15). "The Accidental Diet Doctor". google.com. Retrieved 2009-05-08. [dead link]
  3. ^ a b "Arthur Agatston, MD". Adaf.org. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 

External links[edit]