Association for the Sociology of Religion

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The Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR) is an academic association with more than 700 members worldwide. It publishes a journal, the Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly Review and holds meetings at the same venues and times as the American Sociological Association.[1]The Association describes itself as a "hospitable place for both empirical study and social criticism animated by the social teachings of the church"

History[edit]

The ASR was founded by Catholic sociologists in Chicago in 1938 as the American Catholic Sociological Society.[1] The organization adopted its present name in 1970, reflecting changes in the Vatican's policy that led to greater openness towards other faiths.

Activities[edit]

The association publishes a journal, Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly Review, as well as a quarterly newsletter.[1] It is the co-publisher of an annual series entitled Religion and the Social Order.[1] The association provides research grants.[1]

The ASR, which has over 700 members worldwide, continues its historical practice of holding its meetings at the same venues and times as the American Sociological Association, allowing mutual cross-fertilisation between the two associations.[1] Past presidents of the ASR include David G. Bromley,[2] James T. Richardson,[3] Eileen Barker[4] and Benton Johnson[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Swatos, William H.; Kivisto, Peter (1998). Encyclopedia of religion and society. Rowman Altamira. ISBN 978-0-7619-8956-1. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  2. ^ Lewis, James R. (2004). The Oxford handbook of new religious movements. Oxford University Press US. pp. xi. ISBN 978-0-19-514986-9. 
  3. ^ Bromley, David G. (2007). Teaching new religious movements. Oxford University Press US. pp. x. ISBN 978-0-19-517729-9. 
  4. ^ Beckford, James A.; Richardson, James T. (2003). Challenging Religion: Essays in Honour of Eileen Barker. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-415-30948-6. 
  5. ^ Swatos, William H.; Peter Kivisto (1998). Encyclopedia of Relition and Society. Latham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 251–252. ISBN 978-0-7619-8956-1. 

External links[edit]