Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament

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Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament
Conference Baseball Championship
Atlantic Coast Conference wordmark.svg
Sport Baseball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Number of teams 10
Format 2 division round-robin tournament and
championship game
Current stadium NewBridge Bank Park
Current location Greensboro, NC
Played 1973–1978, 1980–present
Last contest 2014
Current champion Georgia Tech (9)
Most championships Clemson Tigers (9), Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets (9)
TV partner(s) FS South, Sun Sports, CSN Mid-Atlantic, NESN, SportSouth
Official website TheACC.com Baseball
Host stadiums
Durham Bulls Athletic Park (1996, 1998–99, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015–18)
NewBridge Bank Park (2010, 2012, 2014)
Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville (2005–08)
Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium (2003–04)
Florida Power Park (1997, 2002)
Knights Stadium (2000–01)
Greenville Municipal Stadium (1987–95)
Durham Athletic Park (1984, 1986)
Russ Chandler Stadium (1985)
Boshamer Stadium (1973, 1975, 1981–83)
Doak Field (1974, 1980)
Beautiful Tiger Field (1976–78)
Host locations
Durham, NC (1984, 1986, 1996, 1998, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015–18)
Greensboro, NC (2010, 2012, 2014)
Jacksonville, FL (2005–08)
Salem, VA (2003–04)
St. Petersburg, FL (1997, 2002)
Fort Mill, SC (2000–01)
Greenville, SC (1987–95)
Atlanta, GA (1985)
Chapel Hill, NC (1973, 1975, 1981–83)
Raleigh, NC (1974, 1980)
Clemson, SC (1976–78)

The Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament, sometimes referred to simply as the ACC Tournament, is the conference championship tournament in baseball for the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). In 2014, the event adopted a modified ten-team pool play format. The winner receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament.

History[edit]

The ACC has a history of odd formats for its baseball championship. Since 1973, the first year of the tournament, the format has changed five times. The current format is a two-group, four-team round robin tournament with the winner of each grouping playing in a winner-take-all championship game.

1973–78[edit]

See Example: 1976 Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament

For the first six seasons of the tournament, the ACC had seven members, resulting in a format where the #1 seed received a bye to play the winner of the #4 v #5 match-up. The first round of the tournament was single-elimination with the losers going home. After the first round, the remaining 4 teams played a traditional double-elimination-style tournament.

1979[edit]

Due to conflicts with exams, the ACC opted to not hold a tournament. Instead, the regular season winner Clemson was given the conference's automatic bid to the 1979 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament.

1980–2003[edit]

Example: 1981 Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament

Beginning with the addition of Georgia Tech to the conference in 1980, the ACC began using a format closer to that of a true double-elimination tournament with a few exceptions.

  • The winner of the Winner's Bracket Quarterfinal match (Game 12) would play the winner of either Quarterfinal match of the Loser's Bracket (Game 10 or 11). The decision of which teams faced each other was determined by whether or not they had already faced each other in the tournament.

From TheACC.com:

On Saturday (The Semifinals) of the ACC Baseball Tournament, the match-up between the four remaining teams is determined by previous opponents. If teams have played previously in the tournament, every attempt will be made to avoid a repeat match-up between teams, regardless of seed. If it is impossible to avoid a match-up that already occurred, then the determination is based on avoiding the most recent, current tournament match-up, regardless of seed. If no match-ups have occurred, the team left in the winners bracket will play the lowest seeded team from the losers bracket.

  • If the winner of the Winner's Bracket Quarterfinal match (Game 12) loses in the Semifinal match (Game 13), that team will receive a bye and play the winner of the Finals match in a winner-take-all championship game.

1991–2003[edit]

With the introduction of Florida State into the ACC to bring the total teams to nine, the baseball tournament added a Play-In game where the bottom two teams in the conference regular season standings played in a winner-takes-all game for the 8th spot in the regular tournament.

2004[edit]

In 2004, the ACC began using a true eight-team double-elimination tournament with the bottom two teams in regular season conference play facing each other in a single-elimination game where the winner got the #8 spot in the regular tournament.

2005[edit]

In 2004, the conference expanded to 11 teams with the addition of Miami and Virginia Tech. Beginning with the 2005 Baseball Tournament, the tournament switched from a true eight-team double-elimination to two four-team double-elimination brackets with winner of each side playing in a winner-take-all championship game. The bottom four teams in conference play faced off in a single-elimination bracket, with the winner earning the #8 spot in the tournament.

2006[edit]

In 2005, Boston College joined the conference, bringing the total number of members to 12. Instead of adjusting the tournament yet again, the tournament would remain the same format as was developed in 2005, but the ACC eliminated the play-in round.

2007–2013[edit]

See Example: 2007 Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Tournament

Beginning in 2007, the ACC developed a new tournament format that eliminated the brackets altogether. This new format is a two-group, four-team round robin tournament with the winner of each grouping playing in a winner-take-all championship game. Only the top eight teams in the regular season conference standings are invited to play in the tournament. On July 6, 2009, the Atlantic Coast Conference announced a decision to move three future baseball tournaments out of Myrtle Beach, citing miscommunications with the NAACP concerning the display of the Confederate flag in South Carolina. (Charlotte is included in the NAACP Boycott because Knights Stadium is in York County, South Carolina, less than five kilometres from the state line.) The 2010 ACC tournament was initially scheduled to take place at Fenway Park, but cost-containment for schools (most of whom would have to fly to Boston) was cited for moving the tournament to Greensboro. [1][2]

2014[edit]

Beginning in 2014, with the expansion of the conference, the tournament will expand to ten teams. The four lower seeds (7 vs 10 and 8 vs 9) will play a one game play-in game to participate in pool play with the 6 higher seeds. [3]

Champions[edit]

By Year[edit]

Year School Site MVP
1973 NC State Boshamer StadiumChapel Hill, NC
None Selected
1974 NC State Doak FieldRaleigh, NC
1975 NC State Boshamer StadiumChapel Hill, NC
1976 Clemson Beautiful Tiger FieldClemson, SC
1977 Wake Forest Beautiful Tiger Field • Clemson, SC
1978 Clemson Beautiful Tiger Field • Clemson, SC
1979
No Tournament
1980 Clemson Doak FieldRaleigh, NC
1981 Clemson Boshamer StadiumChapel Hill, NC
1982 North Carolina Boshamer Stadium • Chapel Hill, NC
1983 North Carolina Boshamer Stadium • Chapel Hill, NC Scott Bankhead, P, UNC
1984 North Carolina Durham Athletic ParkDurham, NC Todd Wilkinson, OF, UNC[4]
1985 Georgia Tech Russ Chandler Stadium . Atlanta, Ga Scott Jordan, OF, GT
1986 Georgia Tech Durham Athletic ParkDurham, NC Jeff Distasio, 1B, GT
1987 Georgia Tech Greenville Municipal StadiumGreenville, SC Todd Shiver, P, GT
1988 Georgia Tech Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Ty Griffin, 2B, GT
1989 Clemson Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Brian Barnes, P, CU
1990 North Carolina Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Steve Estroff, 1B, UNC
1991 Clemson Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Michael Spiers, OF, CU
1992 NC State Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Matt Donahue, P, NCSU
1993 Clemson Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Jeff Morris, 2B, CU
1994 Clemson Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Shane Monahan, OF, CU
1995 Florida State Greenville Municipal Stadium • Greenville, SC Jonathan Johnson, P, FSU
1996 Virginia Durham Bulls Athletic ParkDurham, NC Seth Greisinger, P, UVA
1997 Florida State Florida Power ParkSt. Petersburg, FL Jeremy Morris, OF, FSU
1998 Wake Forest Durham Bulls Athletic ParkDurham, NC John Hendricks, P, WF
1999 Wake Forest Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC Andrew Riepe, C, WF
2000 Georgia Tech Knights StadiumFort Mill, SC Jason Basil, OF, GT
2001 Wake Forest Knights Stadium • Fort Mill, SC Dave Bush, P, WF
2002 Florida State Florida Power ParkSt. Petersburg, FL Stephen Drew, SS, FSU
2003 Georgia Tech Salem Memorial Baseball StadiumSalem, VA Brian Burks, P, GT
2004 Florida State Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium • Salem, VA Shane Robinson, OF, FSU
2005 Georgia Tech Baseball Grounds of JacksonvilleJacksonville, FL Tyler Greene, SS, GT
2006 Clemson Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville • Jacksonville, FL Tyler Colvin, OF, CU
2007 North Carolina Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville • Jacksonville, FL Josh Horton, DH, UNC
2008 Miami (FL) Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville • Jacksonville, FL Dave DiNatale, OF, UM
2009 Virginia Durham Bulls Athletic ParkDurham, NC Dan Grovatt, OF, UVA
2010 Florida State NewBridge Bank ParkGreensboro, NC Harold Riggins, 1B, NCSU
2011 Virginia Durham Bulls Athletic ParkDurham, NC Steven Proscia, 3B, UVA
2012 Georgia Tech NewBridge Bank ParkGreensboro, NC Jake Davies, 1B/DH/UT, GT
2013 North Carolina Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC Cody Stubbs, 1B, UNC
2014 Georgia Tech NewBridge Bank Park • Greensboro, NC Dusty Isaacs, P, GT
2015 Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC
2016 Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC
2017 Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC
2018 Durham Bulls Athletic Park • Durham, NC

By school[edit]

School Appearances W L Pct Titles Title Years
Boston College 2 3 3 .500 0
Clemson 38 100 62 .617 9 1976, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 2006
Duke 32 21 55 .276 0
Florida State 20 61 33 .649 5 1995, 1997, 2002, 2004, 2010
Georgia Tech 33 74 52 .587 9 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2012, 2014
Maryland 32 17 52 .246 0
Miami (FL) 7 9 12 .428 1 2008
NC State 37 78 67 .537 4 1973, 1974, 1975, 1992
North Carolina 37 65 61 .516 6 1982, 1983, 1984, 1990, 2007, 2013
Virginia 38 47 64 .424 3 1996, 2009, 2011
Virginia Tech 3 5 3 .625 0
Wake Forest 34 47 60 .439 4 1977, 1998, 1999, 2001

Italics indicate school is no longer a member of the ACC.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.theacc.com/sports/m-basebl/spec-rel/050509aaa.html
  2. ^ "ACC moves 3 future baseball tourneys". Associated Press. 2009-07-06. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  3. ^ http://www.theacc.com/#!/page/championship_m-basebl
  4. ^ UNC Athletic Communications staff et al. 2014 North Carolina Baseball Media Guide: p. 72 http://goheels.com/fls/3350/14base/14baseguideweb.pdf.  Missing or empty |title= (help); |chapter= ignored (help)

External links[edit]