Benjamin Bloom

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Benjamin Samuel Bloom
Born (1913-02-21)February 21, 1913
Lansford, Pennsylvania
Died September 13, 1999(1999-09-13) (aged 86)
Chicago
Nationality American
Education Ph.D. in Education
Alma mater Pennsylvania State University, University of Chicago
Occupation Educational psychologist
Employer American Educational Research Association

Benjamin Samuel Bloom (February 21, 1913 – September 13, 1999) was an American educational psychologist who made contributions to the classification of educational objectives and to the theory of mastery-learning. He also directed a research team which conducted a major investigation into the development of exceptional talent whose results are relevant to the question of eminence, exceptional achievement, and greatness.[1] In 1956, Bloom edited the first volume of Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals, which outlined a classification of learning objectives that has come to be known as Bloom's Taxonomy and remains a foundational and essential element within the educational community as evidenced in the 1981 survey Significant writings that have influenced the curriculum: 1906-1981, by H.G. Shane and the 1994 yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education.

Further reading[edit]

  • Bloom, Benjamin S. (1980). All Our Children Learning. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Bloom, Benjamin S. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (1956). Published by Allyn and Bacon, Boston, MA. Copyright (c) 1984 by Pearson Education.
  • Bloom, B. S. (ed). (1985). Developing Talent in Young People. New York: Ballantine Books.
  • Eisner, Eliot W. "Benjamin Bloom: 1913-1999." Prospects, the quarterly review of comparative education (Paris, UNESCO: International Bureau of Education), vol. XXX, no. 3, September 2000. Retrieved from http://www.ibe.unesco.org/publications/ThinkersPdf/bloome.pdf on April 10, 2009.
  • Torsten Husén, Benjamin S. Bloom, in: Joy A. Palmer (ed), Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day, London - New York: Routledge, 2001, pp. 86-90.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bloom, B. S. (ed). (1985). Developing Talent in Young People. New York: Ballantine Books.

External links[edit]

Educational offices
Preceded by
Lee Cronbach
President of the

American Educational Research Association
1965-1966

Succeeded by
Julian Stanley