Benson W. Hough

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Benson Walker Hough
Benson W. Hough.jpg
United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio
In office
February 9, 1925 – November 19, 1935
Appointed by Calvin Coolidge
Preceded by John Elbert Sater
Succeeded by Mell G. Underwood
Associate Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court
In office
December 7, 1920 – December 31, 1922
Preceded by Coleman W. Avery
Succeeded by Florence E. Allen
Personal details
Born (1875-03-05)March 5, 1875
Delaware County, Ohio
Died November 19, 1935(1935-11-19) (aged 60)
Columbus, Ohio
Resting place Berkshire, Delaware County, Ohio
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Edith Markel
Children Catherine
Alma mater Moritz College of Law
Ohio Wesleyan University

Benson W. Hough (March 5, 1875 – November 19, 1935) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Berkshire Township, Delaware County, Ohio, Hough received a M.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1897 and a B.L. from Ohio State University in 1899.[1] He was in private practice in Delaware, Ohio from 1900 to 1916, being the Adjutant General of Ohio, 1915-1916, serving in the United States Army during World War I, from 1917 to 1919. He voluntarily requested a demotion from General to Colonel in order to accompany the Fourth Ohio Infantry, renamed the 166th US Infantry, and incorporated into the 42nd Infantry Division, to France. The request was granted. Hough was elected as a Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio from 1920 to 1923. He was the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio from 1923 to 1925.

On January 31, 1925, Hough was nominated by President Calvin Coolidge to a seat on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio vacated by John Elbert Sater. Hough was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 9, 1925, and received his commission the same day, serving thereafter until his death.

He was married to Edith Markel on June 25, 1902, and had one child, Catherine. He died at a Columbus hospital, and was buried in at his childhood home of Berkshire, Delaware County.[1]

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