Brazier (hieroglyph)

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Q7
Brazier
in hieroglyphs

The Ancient Egyptian Brazier hieroglyph is Gardiner sign listed no. Q7 for the cooking brazier. It is shown from the Old Kingdom in the style of a vertical burning flame upon four feet, but the hieroglyph has the flame hiding the fourth foot. Another Gardiner unlisted form has the four feet, with no flame, and in a plan view.

The brazier hieroglyph is used in Egyptian hieroglyphs as a determinative for the 'brazier', or 'flame', or words related to 'cooking with a brazier', or a substitute.[1] The brazier also has the Egyptian language value of 'kh-('ḫ), '(kh)), the horizontal arm hieroglyph-( ' ), Gardiner no D36,
a
, and the sieve-(placenta)-kh hieroglyph, no. Aa1,
Aa1
Preceded by
P6

mast
'h'-('ḥ')
Mast (hieroglyph)
Q7

brazier
'(kh)
('ḫ)
Succeeded by
I1

Lizard
'(sh)
Succeeded by
I1
,
G35

lizard--cormorant
'(sh) -- 'q

Rosetta Stone usage[edit]

Rosetta Stone, detail of hieroglyph script.
D36
Aa1
Q7
"offering"
in hieroglyphs

In the 196 BC Rosetta Stone, the Brazier hieroglyph is used two times, Rosetta lines R3, and R11; both are listings of sacrifices and offerings, as part of the nineteen reasons for rewarding pharaoh Ptolemy V, and thus creating the Rosetta Stone; (ten deeds are stated then to honor Ptolemy V, including creating, and erecting the Decree of Memphis (Ptolemy V) on the stela).

Both uses are the hieroglyph composition blocks for uah 'kh, for "burnt offerings".

Line R3 states: ".. He brought providing in them for their temples at the festival great, burnt offerings, [animals for] slaughter-(=sacrifices), drink offerings-(=libations), and things every usually made..."[2]

M17 G43 (for)
R8 O6 X1
O1
Z2
O34
N35
(temples of them)
Aa13
W4
O29
(at the festival great)
V29 Aa1
D36
Q7 (burnt offerings)

Line R11 states: "Shall be offered a burnt offering...", ("emtutu uah a(kh)").


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Betrò, 1995. Hieroglyphics: The Writings of Ancient Egypt, "Brazier", p. 175.
  2. ^ Budge. The Rosetta Stone, p. 150.