Burn notice (document)

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A burn notice is an official statement issued by an intelligence agency to other agencies. It states that an asset or intelligence source is unreliable for one or more reasons, often fabrication.[1] This is essentially a directive for the recipient to disregard or "burn" all information derived from that individual or group.[2]

Examples[edit]

  • Ahmed Chalabi[3]
  • Curveball—"The CIA has since issued an official 'burn notice' formally retracting more than 100 intelligence reports based on his information."[4][5]
  • Manucher Ghorbanifar—1984 and 1986. "The CIA considered Ghorbanifar a dangerous con man and had issued a 'burn notice' recommending that no U.S. agency have any dealings with him."[6][7][8]
  • Ali Abdel Saoud Mohamed, who was recruited by the CIA and immediately revealed himself to be a double agent. "The CIA issued a burn notice to U.S. and allied intelligence services that Mohamed was not to be trusted."[9]

Pop culture[edit]

  • Burn Notice is an American television series which stars Jeffrey Donovan as the character Michael Westen, a former covert-operations agent who has been burned.
  • In the Archer episode, "Job Offer", the titular Archer is issued a burn notice by his mother and former employer when he leaves for another intelligence agency.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Burn Notice Definition, Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, accessed via dtic.mil April 9, 2008
  2. ^ West, Nigel (2006). Historical dictionary of international intelligence 4. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-8108-5578-6. 
  3. ^ Mahle, Melissa Boyle (2004). Denial and deception: an insider's view of the CIA from Iran-contra to 9/11. Nation Books. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-56025-649-6. 
  4. ^ "Curveball: 'I Am Not To Blame' for U.S. War in Iraq". ABC News. Retrieved 2008-06-27. "The CIA has since issued an official 'burn notice' formally retracting more than 100 intelligence reports based on his information." 
  5. ^ Hosenball, Mark (January 17, 2006). "Who's Fault is CurveBall Mess?". Newsweek. "U.S. intel quickly figured the source was a 'fabricator,' but a so-called burn notice about the source's unreliability was somehow mislaid." 
  6. ^ "They're Back". American Prospect. September 26, 2006. Retrieved 2008-06-27. "Given this associate's acknowledged recent history as a conduit for information from Ghorbanifar, who is the subject of two CIA 'burn notices' warning its employees not to deal with him, I wondered if it was a non-governmental person or congressional staffer calling him now." 
  7. ^ Bamford, James (July 24, 2006). "Iran: The Next War". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2008-06-27. "The CIA considered Ghorbanifar a dangerous con man and had issued a 'burn notice' recommending that no U.S. agency have any dealings with him." 
  8. ^ "Niger Yellowcake and The Man Who Forged Too Much". uruknet.info. Retrieved 2008-06-27. "The CIA issued a 'burn notice' (or 'Fabricator Notice') on Ghorbanifar in ..." 
  9. ^ John M. Berger, Jihad Joe: Americans Who Go to War in the Name of Islam, pp 54, ISBN 1597976938, [1] [2], Potomac Books Inc, May 15, 2011