Carrier Dove (schooner)

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This article is about the schooner. For the clipper ship, see Carrier Dove (clipper).
StateLibQld 1 127155 Carrier Dove (ship).jpg
Schooner Carrier Dove
1912 - San Pedro, CA - 4 masted schooner Carrier Dove, dockside, unloading her wares
Career (United States)
Name: Carrier Dove
Builder: Hall Brothers, Port Blakely, WA
Launched: 1890
Fate: Struck reef near Molokai and sank, Nov. 21, 1921
General characteristics
Class and type: 4-masted schooner
Tons burthen: 707 or 672 tons [1][2]
Length: 188 ft 7 in (57.48 m)
Beam: 39 ft (12 m)
Depth of hold: 14 ft 2 in (4.32 m)[3]

The Carrier Dove was a 4-masted schooner built by the Hall Brothers in Port Blakely in 1890.[1] She worked in the West coast lumber trade and in fishing.

Career of 1890 schooner Carrier Dove[edit]

In 1893, Carrier Dove was active in the foreign lumber trade out of British Columbia.[2] The Alaska Packers Association also described Carrier Dove as a "salmon vessel" which had sustained a partial loss at sea amounting to $11,500, in 1893.[4] In 1894, she loaded lumber at Nanaimo under Capt. Brandt.[5] She was used for fishing between 1902-1907. On Nov. 19, 1903, while at sea in the vicinity of Juneau, AK, a seaman named John Macas jumped overboard. "A boat was launched and man picked up, but died soon afterwards."[6]

The Seattle-Alaska Fish Co. began business in Seattle in 1902, using for its home station the old West Seattle plant of the Oceanic Packing Co. The first year the schooner Carrier Dove was the only vessel outfitted, but in 1903 the schooner Nellie Colman was added. In 1906 the latter vessel was sold, her place being taken by the schooner Maid of Orleans. Only the Carrier Dove was outfitted in 1907, but in 1908 she was sold and the Maid of Orleans outfitted. In 1910 the company was absorbed by the King & Winge Codfish Co., of Seattle.[7]

Carrier Dove took a load of lumber from Masset Inlet, B.C. to Port Adelaide in 1919-1920.[8]

1921 shipwreck[edit]

Schooner Carrier Dove was wrecked after striking a reef near the Hawaiian island of Molokai on Nov. 21, 1921.[1] She had become "waterlogged and unmanageable while on a voyage from Tonga Island for San Francisco with copra."[9] The Pacific Marine Review reported that the loss of the "Moore schooner Carrier Dove" was estimated at "$77,000 cargo, no hull."[10]

The American schooner Carrier Dove, wrecked on the Island of Molokai, Hawaii, November 2, was "lost" twice before, once in September, 1903, on the China coast, and again in February, 1920, during a hurricane that cast her on a reef of Fiji. She was salved both times. No salvage of the latest wreck is possible.[10]

"Two tons of copra from the wreck were gathered up four days later on the Kai-lua beach on Oahu."[11] The wreck was still "visible on the ocean bottom" as of 2002.[12]

Career (Canada)
Builder: Wolfe Island, Ontario
Launched: 1854
Fate: Sunk on the American side of Lake Ontario, March 3, 1876
General characteristics
Class and type: Schooner

1854 Great Lakes schooner Carrier Dove[edit]

An earlier schooner named Carrier Dove was built in 1854 at Wolfe Island, Ontario. She sunk on the American side of Lake Ontario March 3, 1876, when the boat was "swept from her moorings and dragged underneath another schooner."

Carrier Dove in literature[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gibbs, Jim (1968). West Coast Windjammers in Story and Pictures. Seattle: Superior Publishing Co. p. 138. ISBN 978-0-517-17060-1. 
  2. ^ a b Wright, E W (1895). Lewis & Dryden's marine history of the Pacific Northwest: an illustrated review of the growth and development of the maritime industry, from the advent of the earliest navigators to the present time, with sketches and portraits of a number of well-known marine men. Portland, OR: Lewis & Dryden Print. Co. p. 410. OCLC 10298452. 
  3. ^ Wright, E W (1895). Lewis & Dryden's marine history of the Pacific Northwest: an illustrated review of the growth and development of the maritime industry, from the advent of the earliest navigators to the present time, with sketches and portraits of a number of well-known marine men. Portland, OR: Lewis & Dryden Print. Co. pp. 380–381. OCLC 10298452. 
  4. ^ Alaska fisheries: hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Fisheries ... 1912
  5. ^ Wright, E W (1895). Lewis & Dryden's marine history of the Pacific Northwest: an illustrated review of the growth and development of the maritime industry, from the advent of the earliest navigators to the present time, with sketches and portraits of a number of well-known marine men. Portland, OR: Lewis & Dryden Print. Co. p. 414. OCLC 10298452. 
  6. ^ Reports of the Department of Commerce and Labor 1904-1912. Report of the Steamboat Inspection Service, p. 377
  7. ^ Cobb, John N (1916). Pacific Cod Fisheries. Bureau of Fisheries document. no. 830. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office. p. 35. OCLC 14263968. 
  8. ^ Pacific Steam Navigation Company. 1919. Sea breezes, the ship lovers' digest, Volumes 13-14. p. 306
  9. ^ Newell, Gordon R; McCurdy, H W (1966). The H. W. McCurdy marine history of the Pacific Northwest: an illustrated review of the growth and development of the maritime industry from 1895, the date of publication of the last such comprehensive history (Lewis & Dryden's marine history of the Pacific Northwest) to the present time, with sketches and portraits of a number of well-known marine men. Seattle: Superior Pub. Co. p. 329. OCLC 16690016. 
  10. ^ a b Howell, Charles F (December 1918). "Here and There". Pacific Marine Review (San Francisco: J. S. Hines) 18: 758. OCLC 2449383. 
  11. ^ Mid-Pacific magazine, Vol. 49. 1936. p. 109
  12. ^ Hawai'i Place Names: Shores, Beaches, and Surf Sites, by John R. K. Clark, 2002. p. 40-41

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

1890 schooner Carrier Dove[edit]

1854 schooner Carrier Dove[edit]

Other Carrier Dove links[edit]