Charticle

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A charticle is a combination of text, images and graphics that takes the place of a full article.[1] Unlike a traditional news article that usually consists of large blocks of text with occasional images or other graphics used to enhance the article's visual appeal or to convey some ancillary information, a charticle is composed primarily of an image with text used only sparingly to provide additional information. The ratio of text to images is inverted in a charticle compared to a traditional article, essentially making it the graphic novel equivalent of a traditional news article.

Origins[edit]

Claims have been made that Van McKenzie, the sports editor at the Orlando Sentinel and St. Petersburg Times, incorporated graphics with text in the 1970s. Others claim that Edward Tufte, a design professor at Yale, is behind the article even though he has not coined the term.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stickney, Dane (October–November 2008). "Charticle Fever". American Journalism Review. Retrieved 6 Jan 2009. 
  2. ^ Stickney, Dane (October–November 2008). "Charticle Fever". American Journalism Review. Retrieved 4 Mar 2015.