Cliff Ronning

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Cliff Ronning
Cliff Ronning.jpg
Ronning at the 2008 All-Star Legends Game in Toronto.
Born (1965-10-01) October 1, 1965 (age 49)
Burnaby, BC, CAN
Height 5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for St. Louis Blues
Vancouver Canucks
Phoenix Coyotes
Nashville Predators
Los Angeles Kings
Minnesota Wild
New York Islanders
Asiago Hockey AS
NHL Draft 134th overall, 1984
St. Louis Blues
Playing career 1985–2004

Clifford John Ronning (born October 1, 1965) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey forward. He was selected by the St. Louis Blues in the 7th round of the 1984 NHL Entry Draft, 134th overall. During an NHL career that spanned 18 years, Ronning played for the Blues, Vancouver Canucks, Phoenix Coyotes, Nashville Predators, Los Angeles Kings, Minnesota Wild and New York Islanders.

Playing career[edit]

Ronning played his minor hockey in Burnaby. He led his midget team to the 1982 Air Canada Cup, where they won the gold medal. Ronning was named Most Valuable player and led the tournament in scoring. Prior to being drafted, he played in the Western Hockey League for the New Westminster Bruins, displaying the same excellent scoring touch. In 1983–84, Ronning's draft year, he posted 136 points in 71 games, earning the Jim Piggott Memorial Trophy as the league's rookie of the year. Due to his small stature (Ronning was 5'8"),[1] he was not drafted until the seventh round, when the St. Louis Blues picked him 134th overall. The next season, he returned to New Westminster and accumulated an astonishing 197 points, establishing a WHL record (he was later surpassed by Rob Brown's 212-point season in 1986–87).[2] Accordingly, Ronning earned the WHL Most Valuable Player Award and the Bob Clarke Trophy as the league's leading scorer. Recording just 20 penalty minutes, he was also named the Most Sportsmanlike Player.

After Ronning's record setting season, he joined the Canadian National Team, with whom he played for one and a half seasons. During this stint, Ronning would make his first appearance in the NHL with the Blues, playing five games in the 1986 Stanley Cup Playoffs. Ronning would begin the next season with the National Team again before joining the Blues for the remainder of 1986–87.

Ronning would not, however, find his full stride in St. Louis. He spent part of 1988–89 with the Blues' IHL affiliate, the Peoria Rivermen and played the entirety of the following season in Italy with HC Asiago. When he returned to the Blues in 1990–91, he was traded to his hometown team, the Vancouver Canucks in a five-player deal that sent him with Geoff Courtnall, Robert Dirk, Sergio Momesso and a fifth round draft pick (Brian Loney) in exchange for Garth Butcher and Dan Quinn.

Ronning would quickly become a key element on the rapidly improving Canucks. In 1992–93, he posted a career-high 29 goals and 85 points. On April 15, 1993, in a game against the Los Angeles Kings, he nearly tied Brian Trottier's record for most points in a single period, notching 3 goals and 2 assists in the third (Trottier had six).[3] The following season, Ronning helped the Canucks on their run to the 1994 Stanley Cup Finals, where they eventually lost in game seven to the New York Rangers. He played the seventh game with a broken hand.[4]

Spending another two seasons in Vancouver, Ronning became a free agent after the 1995–96 season and signed with the Phoenix Coyotes for their first season after moving from Winnipeg. Following just over two seasons in Phoenix, Ronning was dealt with Richard Lintner to the Nashville Predators for future considerations.

As he joined the Predators in their expansion year, he took on a leadership role with the fledgling Predators, who finished second-to-last in their first NHL season. In all four seasons with the Predators, Ronning would lead the team in scoring, twice exceeding 60 points. He played an important role in mentoring young players, such as David Legwand.

At the 2001–02 trade deadline, the Predators sent Ronning to the Los Angeles Kings, where he was expected to help the Kings in the playoffs. In the off-season, he was traded from Los Angeles to yet another expansion team, the Minnesota Wild in their third year. Ronning was a veteran presence and still an able scorer, recording 48 points, as the Wild reached the Western Conference Finals before being swept by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim.

In 2003–04, Ronning signed with the New York Islanders, mostly playing as a powerplay specialist, where he recorded 24 points in 40 games played. As the NHL lockout suspended play, Ronning was inactive the following season. When the NHL resumed, Ronning announced his decision to retire on February 15, 2006.[1] Cliff Ronning was involved in two of the most notable games of Patrick Roy’s career. He played against Roy in the 1982 Air Canada Cup midget tournament. Ronning’s team beat Roy’s Sainte-Foy Gouverneurs, and it was the last game of Roy’s midget career. On April 22, 2003, Ronning played for the Minnesota Wild, and played in Roy’s final NHL playoff game.[5]

Awards and achievements[edit]

Cliff Ronning skating with the greats

Records[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Father of four, Taryn, Kristin, Ty and Carly, Ronning returned to live in Vancouver after his retirement. He plays with the Old-timers' Hockey Challenge[6] and coaches a spring hockey team, the Vancouver Selects.[7] Ronning has participated in the research and development of a better hockey stick. [8] In 2009, Cliff Ronning and Ron Kunisaki formed BASE Hockey Labs. President and Co-Founder Ron Kunisaki founded Innovative Hockey, Inc. in 1993 and built the industry's largest high-performance OEM supplier before selling to Warrior Hockey in 2005. Vice-President and Co-Founder Cliff Ronning heads up Base Hockey's Shooting Analysis and Custom Fitting protocol in Burnaby, British Columbia.[9] Recently, Cliff Ronning was featured on Canucks.nhl.com - Where are they now? The article discusses Cliff's NHL career and his current venture BASE Hockey.

Quotes[edit]

Even though I was always one of the smallest kids on my hockey team growing up, I never stopped dreaming about playing in the NHL, so having the ability to live out that dream was unbelievable. I certainly hope that kids who are also small in stature but not in heart will look at me and other similar players and know that their dream can come true through hard work and dedication to the game.[10]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1983–84 New Westminster Bruins WHL 71 69 67 136 10 9 8 13 21 10
1984–85 New Westminster Bruins WHL 70 89 108 197 20 11 10 14 24 4
1985–86 Canadian National Team Intl 71 55 63 118 53
1985–86 St.Louis Blues NHL 5 1 1 2 2
1986–87 Canadian National Team Intl 26 17 16 33 12
1986–87 St.Louis Blues NHL 42 11 14 25 6 4 0 1 1 0
1987–88 St.Louis Blues NHL 26 5 8 13 12
1988–89 Peoria Rivermen IHL 12 11 20 31 8
1988–89 St.Louis Blues NHL 64 24 31 55 18 7 1 3 4 8
1989–90 Asiago HC Italy 42 74 61 135 29
1990–91 St.Louis Blues NHL 48 14 18 32 10
1990–91 Vancouver Canucks NHL 11 6 6 12 0 6 6 3 9 12
1991–92 Vancouver Canucks NHL 80 24 47 71 42 13 8 5 13 6
1992–93 Vancouver Canucks NHL 79 29 56 85 30 12 2 9 11 6
1993–94 Vancouver Canucks NHL 76 25 43 68 42 24 5 10 15 16
1994–95 Vancouver Canucks NHL 41 6 19 25 27 11 3 5 8 2
1995–96 Vancouver Canucks NHL 79 22 45 67 42 6 0 2 2 6
1996–97 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 69 19 32 51 26 7 0 7 7 12
1997–98 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 80 11 44 55 36 6 1 3 4 4
1998–99 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 7 2 5 7 2
1998–99 Nashville Predators NHL 72 18 35 53 40
1999–00 Nashville Predators NHL 82 26 36 62 34
2000–01 Nashville Predators NHL 80 19 43 62 28
2001–02 Nashville Predators NHL 67 18 31 49 24
2001–02 Los Angeles Kings NHL 14 1 4 5 8 4 0 1 1 2
2002–03 Minnesota Wild NHL 80 17 31 48 24 17 2 7 9 4
2003–04 New York Islanders NHL 40 9 15 24 2 4 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 1137 306 563 869 453 126 29 57 86 72

Transactions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Cliff Ronning on Legends of Hockey". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2008-07-15. 
  2. ^ "CHL Record Book". Canadian Hockey League. Retrieved 2008-07-15. [dead link]
  3. ^ Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2003). NHL Official Guide & Record Book 2004. Toronto: Dan Diamond and Associates. p. 165. 
  4. ^ Yannis, Alex (1994-06-15). "Canucks Are Out of Step In Big Dance". The New York Times. p. B17. 
  5. ^ Patrick Roy, winning, nothing else, p.483 , by Michel Roy, translated by Charles Phillips, 2008, John Wiley & Sons, Mississauga, ON, ISBN 978-0-470-15616-2
  6. ^ "Player profile at Old-timers' Hockey Challenge". The Old-timers' Hockey Challenge. Retrieved 2009-03-09. 
  7. ^ "Ronning big on new NHL". The Morning Star. Retrieved 2009-02-15. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Flashback Feature: Where are they now? Cliff Ronning". NHL.com - Predators. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 
  9. ^ "Canucks Feature: Where are they now? Cliff Ronning". NHL.com - Canucks. Retrieved 2010-09-01. 
  10. ^ "Cliff Ronning quotes". Thinkexits.com. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 

External links[edit]