Colony Palms Hotel

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Colony Palms Hotel
General information
Address 572 N. Indian Canyon Dr.
Palm Springs, California
Coordinates 33°49′53″N 116°32′42″W / 33.8315°N 116.5450°W / 33.8315; -116.5450Coordinates: 33°49′53″N 116°32′42″W / 33.8315°N 116.5450°W / 33.8315; -116.5450
Opening 1936
Owner Michael Rosenfeld
(Woodridge Capital Partners)
Management Colony Palms Hotel
Technical details
Floor count 2
Design and construction
Architect Martyn Lawrence-Bullard
(2007 renovation)
Developer Al Wertheimer
Other information
Number of rooms 52
Number of suites 5
Number of restaurants 1
Website
Colony Palms Hotel

The Colony Palms Hotel is located in Palm Springs, California. The hotel has 56 rooms and suites.

It re-opened after a 2007 renovation, and features the "Winner's Circle Suite" in honor of previous owners, Robert S. and Andrea Leeds Howard (owners of the racehorse Seabiscuit).

History[edit]

The Colony Palms Hotel was originally built as the "Colonial House" by Las Vegas casino owner and Purple Gang member[1] Al Wertheimer.[2]:250 The hotel began receiving guests in 1936, and had a reputed downstairs speakeasy and brothel. It was renamed "Howard Manor" in the late 1940s when Robert and Andrea Leeds Howard took possession.[3] (Robert Howard was the son of Charles S. Howard.) Boxing champion Jack Dempsey was also an owner.[3] For the next 25 years the hotel was a haven for young Hollywood in Palm Springs.

In the 1970s, it became a health spa called The Palms operated by Sheila Cluff (owner of The Oaks in Ojai, California).[1]

The original hotel had a mural on the wall that was Botticelli-esque in nature, with some frolicking nudes. The new owner (Steve Ohren) preserved the original mural from 1935[4] when redesigning the resort with Martyn Lawrence-Bullard.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Moore, Dawn (December 2007). "Shine on Colony Palms: A passion for preservation returns a historic property to it seductive side". Palm Springs Life. 
  2. ^ Niemann, Greg (2006). "Ch. 46: Do You Remember? Gone But Not Forgotten". Palm Springs Legends: creation of a desert oasis. San Diego, CA: Sunbelt Publications. p. 286. ISBN 978-0-932653-74-1. OCLC 61211290.  (here for Table of Contents)
  3. ^ a b Vincent, Roger (June 18, 2012). "L.A. investors acquire Palm Springs hotel". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 16, 2012.  (with correction on: "For the record" (June 22, 2012). Los Angeles Times)
  4. ^ http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060528/BUSINESS01/605280330 (subscription required)

External links[edit]