Confession

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For other uses, see Confession (disambiguation).
"Confess" redirects here. For other uses, see Confess (disambiguation).

A confession is a statement made by a person or a group of people acknowledging some personal fact that the person (or the group) would prefer to keep hidden. The term is generally associated with an admission of a moral or legal wrong. A legal confession is an admission of some wrongdoing that has legal consequence, while a confession in religion is usually more akin to a ritual by which the person acknowledges thoughts or actions considered sinful or morally wrong within the confines of the confessor's religion. Socially, however, the term may refer to admissions that are neither legally nor religiously significant.

References[edit]

Confession from a religious perspective has implications of freedom from guilt and promises made in Gods Word for salvation. Romans 10:9 "That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved". KJB Romans 10:10 "For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation:.KJB

Confession is NOT being sorry for being caught. Confession is being honest about how wrong you have been and seeking to restore your relationship.