Daniel Cramer

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Daniel Cramer.

Daniel Cramer (Daniel Candidus) (20 January 1568 – 5 October 1637) was a German Lutheran theologian and writer from Reetz (Recz), Brandenburg. He was an opponent of the Ramists and the Jesuits.

Life[edit]

He became professor and archdeacon at Stettin. Earlier, in the 1590s, he was at the University of Marburg, writing on Aristotle.[1][2]

Writings[edit]

He is now remembered for his emblem book Emblemata Sacra (1617).[3] This was followed by the Octaginta emblemata moralia nova (1630).

He wrote also neo-Latin drama, and controversial works in theology. For the Duke of Pomerania, Philipp II, he became involved in writing the church history Pomerania;[4] his preaching in front of Philipp is recorded.[4]

Works[edit]

  • Areteugenia drama [5]
  • Plagium (1593) drama
  • Isagoge in Metaphysicam Aristotelis (1594)
  • Synopsis trium librorum rhetoricorum Aristotelis (Stettin, 1597)
  • Extract und kurtzer warhafftiger Bericht vom Colloquio zu Regensburg, zwischen unsern Theologen ... und den Gehsuiten (Stettin, 1602)
  • Methodus concionandi, de interpretatione cujusvis textus biblici, tam artificiosa quam populari (Stettin, 1605)
  • Das Grosse Pomrische Kirchen-Chronicon, four volumes (Stettin, 1628)

References[edit]

  • Adam McLean (editor), Fiona Tait (translator)(1991) The Rosicrucian Emblems of Daniel Cramer: The True Society of Jesus and the Rosy Cross
  • Sabine Mödersheim (1994) "Domini Doctrina Coronat". Die geistliche Emblematik Daniel Cramers (1568-1637)
  • Wolfgang Harms and Michael Schilling (editors of reprint) (1994) Daniel Cramer: Emblemata Sacra
  • Angela Baumann-Koch (2001) Frühe lutherische Gebetsliteratur bei Andreas Musculus und Daniel Cramer
  • Friedrich Wagnitz (Kiel 2001), Daniel Cramer (1568-1637). Ein Leben in Stettin um 1600

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1]. The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy describes his Isagoge as the earliest German textbook on metaphysics. (p.626)
  2. ^ One of his pupils was Jakob Martini (1570-1649), author of Exercitationes metaphysicae.[2]
  3. ^ Composed with the academic and poet Conrad Bachmann (1572-1646). The first edition of 40 was called Decades quatuor emblematum sacrorum. The 1624 edition (of 50) may be better known.
  4. ^ [3]. This was the first such history, and written from a strictly Lutheran perspective (this PDF, about the year 1637, on Cramer).

External links[edit]