Dengizich

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Dengizich (spelled Δεγγιζίχ/Dengizikh in Priscus' account; spelled Dikkiz on a silver plate;[1] died 468[2] or 469[3]), ruler of the Akatziroi, was a son of Attila. The other forms of his name are Denzic (Marcellinus Comes, Chronicon, s. a. 469) and Dintzic (Jordanes, Getica 272). The form recorded by Priscus may include the title "wise", for Dikkiz ükü reduced to Dikkizuk.[4] The word Dengizich means "little sea" in old Turkic (*Däŋiziq, where *-iq is the diminutive suffix[5]). This is also said to be the root of the name Genghis. The word is also similar to Mongolian language word "tengis" meaning "ocean/sea." It could be translated as Turkish, "Dokuz ok (Nine tribes)" which is possibly a mis-interpretation of his nation instead of personal name.[citation needed]

Some time during his reign, the Utigurs (Onogurs) first crossed the river Volga (according to Zacharias Rhetor[6]). Priscus is clearer, saying that in 463 AD a mixed Saragur, Urog and Unogur embassy asked Byzantium for an alliance, having been dislodged by the Avars' drive towards the west.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mukhamadiev A.G., 1995, "Khan Diggiz dish inscription"//"Problems of lingo-ethno-history of the Tatar people", Kazan, Tatar Publishing, p. 75, ISBN 5-201-08300, (in Russian)
  2. ^ Huns: dateline
  3. ^ Helmolt, Hans Ferdinand: The World's History: A Survey of Man's Record, page 328. W. Heinemann, 1907 (via: Google Book Search)
  4. ^ Mukhamadiev A.G., 1995, "Khan Diggiz dish inscription"//"Problems of lingo-ethno-history of the Tatar people", p. 75
  5. ^ Otto Maenchen-Helfen The World of the Huns
  6. ^ The Syrian compilation of Church Historian Zacharias Rhetor bishop of Mytilene
  7. ^ Priscus. Excerpta de legationibus. Ed. S. de Boor. Berolini, 1903, p. 586
Preceded by
Karadach
Ellac
Hunnic Ruler
458–469
Succeeded by
Ernakh