Rugila

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Rugila (died 434),[1] also referred to as Rua, Ruhas, Ruga and Rona (Greek: ΄Ρούγας, ΄Ροϋνας, ΄Ρωίλας), was a warlord who was a major factor in the Huns' early victories over the Roman Empire. He served as an important forerunner to Attila the Hun during the fifth century AD.

Campaigns[edit]

Initially Rugila had ruled together with his brother Octar (Optar), who died ca. 430 during a military campaign against the Burgundians.[2] In 432, Rugila is mentioned as a sole ruler of the Huns.[3] At that time, Aëtius lost his office and estate, and fled to the Huns. With their help, he was reinstated into his office again. Some time later, when some tribes previously subdued by the Huns fled to the East Roman territory, Rugila demanded their surrender through his envoy Esla and threatened with war, if his demand is refused.

Rugila invaded Thrace in c.421-2 and 434. On the first occasion he forced Constantinople to purchase his withdrawal by promising an annual ransom of 350 lbs of gold for the next fifteen years. In 434 he attempted to exploit the fact that large numbers of imperial troops were absent from the Balkans defending Carthage from the Vandals, but his premature death ended that adventure.[1]

Death and successors[edit]

Rugila died, being "struck dead with a thunderbolt", and the rest of the Hunnic army reportedly perished due to a plague epidemic.[4][5]

After his death, Attila and Bleda, sons of his brother Mundzuk (Mundiuch), became joint rulers of the united Hunnic tribes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lee, A.D. (2013) From Rome to Byzantium AD 363 to 565: The Transformation of Ancient Rome. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 118-119. ISBN 9780748627912
  2. ^ Maenchen_Helfen, Otto. The world of the Huns: studies in their history and culture. University of California Press, 1973. p. 82. 
  3. ^ Maenchen_Helfen, Otto. The world of the Huns: studies in their history and culture. University of California Press, 1973. p. 87. 
  4. ^ NPNF2-02. Socrates and Sozomenus Ecclesiastical Histories Chapter XLIII.—Calamities of the Barbarians who had been the Usurper John’s Allies. Christian Classics Ethereal Library
  5. ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Theodoret, Book V. Chapter XXXVI.—Of the removal of the remains of John and of the faith of Theodosius and his sisters.
Preceded by
Octar
Hunnic rulers
432–434
Succeeded by
Joint rule
Attila & Bleda