Edna Staebler Award

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Edna Staebler Award
Awarded for the best creative non-fiction book with Canadian significance by a new Canadian writer
Sponsor An Edna Staebler financial endowment
Country Canada
Presented by Faculty of Arts,
Wilfrid Laurier University
Reward C$10,000
First awarded 1991
Official website http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=2529

The Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction is an annual literary award recognizing the previous year's best creative nonfiction book with a "Canadian locale and/or significance" that is a Canadian writer's "first or second published book of any type or genre". It was established by an endowment from Edna Staebler, a literary journalist best known for cookbooks, and was inaugurated in 1991 for publication year 1990. The award is administered by Wilfrid Laurier University's Faculty of Arts.[1] Only submitted books are considered.

For purposes of the award, "Creative non-fiction is literary not journalistic. The writer does not merely give information but intimately shares an experience with the reader by telling a factual story using the devices of fiction ... [details deleted]  Rather than emphasizing objectivity, the book should have feeling, and should be a compelling, engaging read."

Winners[edit]

The panel may "grant or withhold the award in any year." In fact the award has been granted every year and there were two winners in 1993 (published 1992).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Faculty of Arts. "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  2. ^ Faculty of Arts (1991). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Susan Mayse. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  3. ^ Faculty of Arts (1992). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Marie Wadden. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  4. ^ Faculty of Arts (1993). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Liza Potvin. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  5. ^ Faculty of Arts (1993). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Elizabeth Hay. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  6. ^ Faculty of Arts (1994). Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Linda Johns. Retrieved 11/21/2012.
  7. ^ Faculty of Arts (1995). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Denise Chong. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  8. ^ Faculty of Arts (1996). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. George G. Blackburn. Retrieved 11/21/2012.
  9. ^ Faculty of Arts (1997). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Anne Mullens. Retrieved 11/23/2012.
  10. ^ a b Faculty of Arts (1998). Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Charlotte Gray. Retrieved 11/24/2012.
  11. ^ Faculty of Arts (2000). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Wayson Choy. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  12. ^ Faculty of Arts (2001). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Taras Grescoe. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  13. ^ Faculty of Arts (2002). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Tom Allen. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  14. ^ Faculty of Arts (2003). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Alison Watt. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  15. ^ Faculty of Arts (2004). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Previous winners. Andrea Curtis. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  16. ^ Faculty of Arts (2005). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Anne Coleman. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  17. ^ Faculty of Arts (2006). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Francis Chalifour. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  18. ^ Faculty of Arts (2007). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Linden MacIntyre. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  19. ^ Faculty of Arts (2008). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction".wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Bruce Serafin. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  20. ^ Faculty of Arts (2009). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Russell Wangersky. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  21. ^ MacDonald, Scott, (October 14, 2010). "Kitchener author wins Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". Quill & Quire. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  22. ^ Faculty of Arts (September 8, 2011). "Helen Waldstein Wilkes wins 2011 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Helen Waldstein Wilkes. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  23. ^ Faculty of Arts (November 7, 2012). "Joshua Knelman wins 2012 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Joshua Knelman. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  24. ^ Faculty of Arts (July 30, 2013). "Carol Shaben named winner of the 2013 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction. wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Carol Shaben. Retrieved 12/3/2013.

External links[edit]