El Dorado Springs, Missouri

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El Dorado Springs, Missouri
City
Location of El Dorado Springs, Missouri
Location of El Dorado Springs, Missouri
Coordinates: 37°52′15″N 94°1′16″W / 37.87083°N 94.02111°W / 37.87083; -94.02111Coordinates: 37°52′15″N 94°1′16″W / 37.87083°N 94.02111°W / 37.87083; -94.02111
Country United States
State Missouri
County Cedar
Area[1]
 • Total 3.09 sq mi (8.00 km2)
 • Land 3.08 sq mi (7.98 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 850 ft (259 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 3,593
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 3,538
 • Density 1,166.6/sq mi (450.4/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64744
Area code(s) 417
FIPS code 29-21502[4]
GNIS feature ID 0748498[5]

El Dorado Springs is the largest city in Cedar County, Missouri, United States. The population was 3,593 at the 2010 census. The name is commonly shortened to El Dorado, Del Do, or just El Do.

Geography[edit]

El Dorado Springs is located at 37°52′15″N 94°1′16″W / 37.87083°N 94.02111°W / 37.87083; -94.02111 (37.870872, -94.021024).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.09 square miles (8.00 km2), of which, 3.08 square miles (7.98 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 3,593 people, 1,591 households, and 908 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,166.6 inhabitants per square mile (450.4/km2). There were 1,918 housing units at an average density of 622.7 per square mile (240.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.0% White, 0.8% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.2% of the population.

There were 1,591 households of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.5% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.9% were non-families. 38.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.89.

The median age in the city was 41.1 years. 23.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.2% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 21.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.2% male and 53.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 3,775 people, 1,654 households, and 984 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,225.7 people per square mile (473.2/km²). There were 1,897 housing units at an average density of 615.9 per square mile (237.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96% White, 0.4% African American, 1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 1,654 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.5% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 24.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 84.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $20,789, and the median income for a family was $26,366. Males had a median income of $23,109 versus $15,197 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,575. About 18.7% of families and 24.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.7% of those under age 18 and 16.5% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

El Dorado Springs was founded in 1881[7] near a natural spring by brothers Nathaniel and Waldo Cruce who attempted to capitalize on the namesake's spring water. The spring water was claimed to have medicinal value, which made El Dorado Springs a destination for tourists and retirees.[citation needed] The spring water, which has a heavy mineral content, was deemed so valuable that the Cruces named the city after the legendary city of gold, El Dorado.

An annual tradition is the Founder's Day Picnic. It began early in the town's existence as an annual gathering for residents of the town. This three-night event has grown to be the largest attraction of the year, bringing thousands of visitors to the town. A carnival has provided rides in recent years, and the city council hires performers to give free concerts in the city park. This upcoming picnic will be the city's 131st.

Residents of El Dorado Springs pronounce the city name "el-doh-RAY-doh springs".

The town is also commonly referred to as El Do.

El Dorado Springs has two schools: the public school and the private Christian school.

2011 Miss Missouri Sydney Friar was born and raised in El Dorado Springs.

El Dorado Springs boasts the United States longest continually used bandstand.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 273. 

External links[edit]