Enio Sclisizzi

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Enio Sclisizzi
Born (1925-08-01)August 1, 1925
Milton, ON, CAN
Died June 27, 2012(2012-06-27) (aged 86)
Milton, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 168 lb (76 kg; 12 st 0 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Detroit Red Wings
Chicago Black Hawks
Playing career 1946–1959

Jim Enio Sclisizzi (August 1, 1925 – June 27, 2012[1]) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. Sclisizzi played 81 games in the National Hockey League. He played with the Detroit Red Wings and Chicago Black Hawks. Sclisizzi won the Stanley Cup in 1952 with Detroit. When the cup was redone during the 1957-58 season, for some reason his name was omitted from the new version, but his name can still be seen on the original 1952 Detroit team engraving in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Career[edit]

Sclisizzi made his professional debut in the 1946–47 season for the Indianapolis Capitals American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate of the Detroit Red Wings.[2] He made his NHL debut with the Red Wings on April 5, 1947, against the Toronto Maple Leafs during the 1947 Stanley Cup playoffs. Sclisizzi made his regular-season NHL debut on opening day October 15, 1947, but he was sent down to the AHL.[3] Sclisizzi returned to the NHL on March 20, 1948, scoring his first NHL goal in the second period in a game against Toronto.[1] In total, he played 67 regular-season games in the NHL with the Wings. In August 1952, he was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks organization. He played 14 games for the Black Hawks that 1952–53 season but did not play in the NHL again.[3] He spent most of his career in the AHL and the Western Hockey League (WHL). He was a member of the 1950 Calder Cup champion Indianapolis Capitals.[2]

Awards[edit]

Personal[edit]

Sclisizzi fought in World War II.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Milton's first NHLer passes". Inside Halton. June 28, 2012. Retrieved July 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Amodeo, Jim. "Enio Sclisizzi: 1925-2012". Hockey Then and Now. Retrieved July 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Amodeo, Jim. "A Chat with Enio Sclisizzi". Hockey Then and Now. Retrieved September 28, 2011. 

External links[edit]