Eugene C. Bingham

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Eugene Cook Bingham (8 December 1878 – 6 November 1945) was a professor and head of the department of chemistry at Lafayette College.[1] Bingham made many contributions to rheology, a term he is credited (along with Markus Reiner) with introducing.[2] He was a pioneer in both its theory and practice. The type of fluid known as a Bingham plastic or Bingham Fluid is named after him, as is Bingham Stress. He was also one of the people responsible for the construction of the Appalachian Trail.[3]

Biography[edit]

He was born on 8 December 1878 in Cornwall, Vermont.[1]

He was awarded the Franklin Institute's Certificate of Merit in 1921 for his variable pressure viscometer.[4]In 1922, as chairman of the Metric Committee of the American Chemical Society, he campaigned for the United States to adopt the metric system.[5][6]

He died on 6 November 1945.[1]

Legacy[edit]

The Society of Rheology has awarded the Bingham Medal annually since 1948.[7]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (1914) vol. 6(3) pp. 233–237: A new viscometer for general scientific and technical purposes
  • Journal of Physical Chemistry (1914) vol. 18(2) pp. 157–165: The Viscosity of Binary Mixtures
  • Fluidity and Plasticity (1922) McGraw-Hill (Internet Digital Archive)
  • Journal of Physical Chemistry (1925) vol. 29(10) pp. 1201–1204: Plasticity
  • Review of Scientific Instruments (1933) vol. 4 p. 473: The New Science of Rheology
  • Journal of General Physiology (1944) vol. 28 pp. 79–94, pp. 131–149 [Bingham and Roepke], (1945) vol. 28 pp. 605–626: The Rheology of Blood

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Dr. Eugene Bingham. Leading Rheologist Organized Society in 1929. Dies at 67". New York Times. Associated Press. November 7, 1945. p. 23. 
  2. ^ Steffe, J. F. (1996). Rheological Methods in Food Process Engineering (2nd ed.). p. 1. ISBN 0-9632036-1-4. 
  3. ^ Lehman, Paul R. (Fall 1997). "Blue Mountain Eagle Climbing Club". The Historical Review of Berks County (Historical Society of Berks County). 
  4. ^ "Eugene C. Bingham". Franklin Laurate Database. The Franklin Institute. Retrieved December 21, 2010. 
  5. ^ Bingham, E. C. (1922). "Progress in Metric Standardization". J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14 (4): 332–333. 
  6. ^ "Action on Metric System". New York Times. April 11, 1922. 
  7. ^ "Bingham Medalists". The Society of Rheology. November 15, 2010. Retrieved December 21, 2010. 

External links[edit]