Flushing Airport

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Flushing Airport
(closed 1984)
Fl Air 16.jpg
Deserted road to Flushing Airport hangars.
IATA: FLUICAO: KFLU
Summary
Airport type Airport (Airfield)
Owner New York City Economic Development Corporation
Serves New York City
Location College Point, Queens
Elevation AMSL 5 ft / 2 m
Coordinates 40°46′45″N 073°50′00″W / 40.77917°N 73.83333°W / 40.77917; -73.83333Coordinates: 40°46′45″N 073°50′00″W / 40.77917°N 73.83333°W / 40.77917; -73.83333

Flushing Airport is a decommissioned airfield in northern Queens in New York City. It is located in the neighborhood of College Point, near Flushing. The airfield was in operation from 1927 to 1984.

History[edit]

It was originally called Speed's Airport and was one of the busiest airports in New York City before the emergence of the larger LaGuardia Airport.[1] In the early 1970s a skywriting company operated there. In 1977, a Piper Twin Comanche crashed shortly after taking off, killing those on board. The incident, along with frequent flooding, led to the closing of this airport in 1984.[2][3]

The airport has largely reverted to wetland. Since the outbreak of West Nile virus in New York in the late 1990s, the land has received frequent mosquito larvicide spraying.[4] Though considered trespassing, dirt biking trails still see activity and the frozen swamps become an impromptu ice hockey surface by locals in the winter.[citation needed]

As of 2000, Flushing Airport still had its air corridor reserved under FAA regulations.[5] A company called Airships Unlimited has been lobbying to convert the abandoned airport into a "blimp port," citing the fact that Goodyear blimps used this airport in the 1960s.[6] The benefit of this plan would be to preserve the air corridor for Flushing Airport.[5]

In 2004, the Bloomberg administration proposed rezoning the area for commercial development as part of the already existing College Point Corporate Park.[7] However, the plan has met significant protests from the local residents who fear such zoning would bring too much traffic to the area.[8] The proposal has since been deferred.[9]

As of September 2008, the access road is under reconstruction, to be reopened eventually as a regular public through-street. The north hangar was demolished on September 24. The remaining hangars were also demolished as of October 1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Into The Weedy Green Yonder". Forgotten NY. Retrieved 2007-09-03. 
  2. ^ "1977". The Queens Spin. Queens Tribune. Retrieved 2007-09-03. 
  3. ^ Hernandez, Raymond (1993-09-19). "Decision On Heliport Awaits". Neighborhood Report: Flushing (The New York Times). Retrieved 2007-09-05. 
  4. ^ "Health Department to Treat Marsh and Other Non-Residential Areas of Staten Island, Queens, and Bronx with Mosquito Larvicide". Government of New York City. 2007. 
  5. ^ a b O'Grady, Jim (2000-04-09). "Dreaming of Airships in the Skies Above Queens". Neighborhood Report: College Point (The New York Times). Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  6. ^ "College Point Airship Park". Airships Unlimited. 2003. Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  7. ^ "Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg Announces Major Industrial Development To Bring 180 Small Businesses And 1,000 Employees To College Point Corporate Park". Government of New York City. 2004-02-04. Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  8. ^ Vandam, Jeff (2004-08-15). "If There's a Line at This Airport, It's Protesters". Neighborhood Report: College Point (The New York Times). Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  9. ^ Hu, Winnie; Colin Moynihan (2004-10-17). "City Defers Development of Wholesale Center". New York Region (The New York Times). Retrieved 2007-09-25. 

External links[edit]