Portal:New York City

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The New York City Portal

The Flag of New York City
The location of New York City within New York State

New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York is an important center for international diplomacy and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.

Founded as a trading post by colonists of the Dutch Republic in 1626, the city and its surroundings came under English control in 1664 and were renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a county of New York State. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a census-estimated 2012 population of 8,336,697 distributed over a land area of just 302.64 square miles (783.8 km2), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population of approximately 19.8 million people remains by a significant margin the United States' largest Metropolitan Statistical Area. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world.

Many districts and landmarks in New York City have become well known to its approximately 55 million annual visitors. Several sources have ranked New York the most photographed city in the world. Times Square, iconified as "The Crossroads of the World", is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theatre district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. The names of many of the city's bridges, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world. New York City's financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world's leading financial center and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization of its listed companies. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a globally recognized symbol of the United States and its democracy. Manhattan's Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere. Providing continuous 24/7 service, the New York City Subway is one of the most extensive rapid transit systems worldwide. Numerous colleges and universities are in New York, including Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 35 in the world.

Selected article

Stuyvesant High School
Stuyvesant High School is a New York City public high school that specializes in mathematics and science. The school was established in 1904 on Manhattan's East Side as an academic and vocational school for boys, but became coeducational in 1969. Stuyvesant moved to a new building in Battery Park City in 1992, and upon the construction of its Battery Park City building, the facilities for girls became equal with those for boys. The school is noted for its strong academic programs, having produced many notable alumni including four Nobel laureates.

Together with Brooklyn Technical High School and Bronx High School of Science, Stuyvesant is one of the three original academic Specialized High Schools of New York City. Run by the New York City Department of Education, the trio are open to New York City residents and charge no tuition. Admission to each is by competitive examination only, of which Stuyvesant has the highest cutoff score. A long-standing friendly rivalry between Stuyvesant and Bronx Science exists over the Intel Science Talent Search, with each school claiming dominance over the other at various times.

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Staten Island Ferry terminal
Credit: Daniel Schwen

A view of the Staten Island Ferry terminal in Lower Manhattan. Operated by the New York City Department of Transportation, the ferry transports people between the boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island, traving across the Upper New York Bay.

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Selected biography

Irving Washington
Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle", both of which appear in his book The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. His historical works include biographies of George Washington, Oliver Goldsmith and Muhammad, and several histories of 15th-century Spain dealing with subjects such as Christopher Columbus, the Moors, and the Alhambra. Irving served as the U.S. ambassador to Spain from 1842 to 1846.

He made his literary debut in 1802 with a series of observational letters to the Morning Chronicle, written under the pseudonym Jonathan Oldstyle. After moving to England for the family business in 1815, he achieved international fame with the publication of The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. in 1819–20. He continued to publish regularly—and almost always successfully—throughout his life, and completed a five-volume biography of George Washington just eight months before his death, at age 76, in Tarrytown, New York.

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Harry Houdini in 1899

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Johan Santana, the 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 Opening Day starting pitcher for the New York Mets
The New York Mets are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Flushing, Queens, in New York City. They play in the National League East division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starting pitcher is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The New York Mets have used 20 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 50 seasons. The 20 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 26 wins, 12 losses (26–12) and 12 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.

Tom Seaver holds the Mets' record for most Opening Day starts with 11, and has an Opening Day record of 6–0. He also has the most starts in Shea Stadium, the Mets' home ballpark from 1964 through 2008. Seaver and Dwight Gooden hold the Mets' record for most Opening Day wins with six each. Al Jackson and Roger Craig share the worst winning percentage as the Opening Day starting pitcher with a record of 0–2.

From 1968 through 1983, Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers went 16 consecutive years without a loss. During this period, Tom Seaver won six starts with five no decisions, Craig Swan won two starts, and Jerry Koosman, Pat Zachry and Randy Jones won one start apiece. Furthermore, in the 31-year period from 1968 through 1998, Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers only lost two games. During that period, they won 19 games with 10 no decisions. The only losses during this period were by Mike Torrez in 1984 and by Dwight Gooden in 1990.

Overall, Mets Opening Day starting pitchers have a record of 0–1 at the Polo Grounds, a 13–5 record with four no decisions at Shea Stadium and a 1–0 record at Citi Field. In addition, although the Mets were nominally the home team in 2000, the game was played in Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan. Mike Hampton started the game in Tokyo and lost, making the Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers' combined home record 14–7, and their away record 12–5. The Mets went on to play in the World Series in 1969, 1973, 1986 and 2000, and won the 1969 and 1986 World Series championship games. Tom Seaver (1969 and 1973), Dwight Gooden (1986) and Mike Hampton (2000) were the Opening Day starting pitchers when the Mets played in the World Series, and they had a combined Opening Day record of 2–1.

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History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanBritish occupation of New YorkEllis IslandSeptember 11thWTC bombingWorld's FairDraft RiotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotsTammany HallThe Big Apple
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanDowntown ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe NarrowsNewark Bay
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square GardenYankee StadiumCiti FieldTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyUnited Nations HeadquartersSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallOne World Trade CenterRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron BuildingGE BuildingOne Chase Manhattan PlazaGoldman Sachs Building
Transport New York City SubwayIRTBMTStaten Island FerryNew York City Taxi and Limousine CommissionAirTrainJFK AirportLa Guardia AirportNewark Liberty International AirportPort AuthorityNew Jersey TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayLower Manhattan ExpresswayTriborough BridgeBrooklyn–Battery TunnelThrogs Neck BridgeHolland TunnelBrooklyn BridgePulaski SkywayTeterboro AirportNew Jersey Turnpike
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall StreetPort NewarkNASDAQAmerican Stock ExchangeNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityThe New SchoolJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan CollegeSt. John's University
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYOEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal CourtSupreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolAuxiliary PoliceDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeMetsYankeesMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyPublic LibraryLincoln Center
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooConey IslandFlushing MeadowsBattery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltHighbridge ParkBowling GreenLiberty State
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