Portal:New York City

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The New York City Portal

The Flag of New York City
The location of New York City within New York State

New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York is an important center for international diplomacy and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.

Founded as a trading post by colonists of the Dutch Republic in 1626, the city and its surroundings came under English control in 1664 and were renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a county of New York State. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a census-estimated 2012 population of 8,336,697 distributed over a land area of just 302.64 square miles (783.8 km2), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population of approximately 19.8 million people remains by a significant margin the United States' largest Metropolitan Statistical Area. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world.

Many districts and landmarks in New York City have become well known to its approximately 55 million annual visitors. Several sources have ranked New York the most photographed city in the world. Times Square, iconified as "The Crossroads of the World", is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theatre district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. The names of many of the city's bridges, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world. New York City's financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world's leading financial center and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization of its listed companies. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a globally recognized symbol of the United States and its democracy. Manhattan's Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere. Providing continuous 24/7 service, the New York City Subway is one of the most extensive rapid transit systems worldwide. Numerous colleges and universities are in New York, including Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 35 in the world.

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Campbell's logo
Campbell's Soup Cans is a work of art produced in 1962 by Andy Warhol. It consists of thirty-two canvases, each measuring 20 by 16 inches (510 by 410 mm) and consisting one of each of the canned soup varieties the company offered at the time. The individual paintings were produced by a printmaking method—the semi-mechanized silkscreen process, using a non-painterly style. Warhol's exhibition of the piece marked the West Coast debut of pop art. The combination of the semi-mechanized process, the non-painterly style, and the commercial subject initially caused offense, as the work's blatantly mundane commercialism represented a direct affront to the technique and philosophy of abstract expressionism. This controversy led to a great deal of debate about the merits and ethics of such work. Warhol's motives as an artist were questioned, and they continue to be topical to this day. The large public commotion helped transform Warhol from being an accomplished 1950s commercial illustrator to a notable fine artist. Because of the eventual popularity of the entire series of similarly themed works, Warhol's reputation grew to the point where he was not only the most-renowned American pop art artist, but also the highest-priced living American artist.

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Bird's eye panorama of Manhattan in 1873
Credit: George Schlegel lithographers

Bird's eye panorama of Manhattan in 1873. The Brooklyn Bridge is inaccurate as the bridge was not completed for another 10 years.

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Walter Francis O'Malley (October 9, 1903 – August 9, 1979) was an American sports executive who owned the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers team in Major League Baseball from 1950 to 1979. He served as Brooklyn Dodgers chief legal counsel when Jackie Robinson broke the racial color barrier in 1947. In 1958, as owner of the Dodgers, he brought major league baseball to the West Coast, moving the Dodgers from Brooklyn to Los Angeles and coordinating the move of the New York Giants to San Francisco at a time when there were no teams west of Missouri.

For this, he was long vilified by Brooklyn Dodgers fans. However, neutral parties describe him as a visionary for the same business action, and many authorities cite him as one of the most influential sportsmen of the 20th century. His detractors who say that he was not a visionary, but instead a man who was in the right place at the right time, still regard him as the most powerful and influential owner in baseball after moving the team. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for his contributions to and influence on the game of baseball.

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Hallett Nature Sanctuary

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Guggenheim Museum

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The discography of Eric B. & Rakim, an American hip hop duo from New York City, consists of four studio albums, five compilation albums, 15 singles, and nine music videos. Eric B. & Rakim formed and signed a record deal with Zakia Records in 1985. The following year, the duo signed a deal with 4th & B'way Records. Their debut album Paid in Full was released in 1987. In the United States, it peaked at number 58 on the Billboard 200, number 8 on R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, and was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It appeared on the Dutch, New Zealand, and UK Albums Chart. Paid in Full composed of five singles, four of which appeared on Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs. The fifth single "Paid in Full" (1988) peaked within the top five of the Dutch and New Zealand Singles Chart.

Their second studio album, Follow the Leader (1988), peaked at number 22 on the Billboard 200, number 7 on R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, and was certified gold by the RIAA. The album peaked at 25 on the UK Albums Chart, and appeared on the Swedish, Dutch, and New Zealand Albums Chart. Three songs from the album were released as singles: "Follow the Leader", "Microphone Fiend", and "The R", the first and last of which appeared on Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs. The duo's third studio album Let the Rhythm Hit 'Em was released in 1990. It peaked at number 32 on the Billboard 200, number 10 on R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, and was certified gold by the RIAA. The album appeared on the UK and Dutch Albums Chart. Let the Rhythm Hit 'Em spawned three singles, including the title track and "In the Ghetto", both of which peaked within the top 10 on US Hot Rap Tracks. Don't Sweat the Technique (1992) was the duo's fourth studio album. It peaked at number 22 on the Billboard 200 and number 9 on R&B/Hip-Hop Albums. It appeared on the UK Albums chart. Four songs, all of which appeared in the top 40 on R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, were released as singles from the album. The title track, released as the third single, topped Hot Rap Tracks. In 1992 after Don't Sweat the Technique, Eric B. & Rakim disbanded. From 2001 to 2010, five compilation albums have been released: 20th Century Masters – The Millennium Collection: The Best of Eric B. & Rakim (2001), Classic (2003), Gold (2005), Repaid in Full: The Paid in Full Remixed (2008), and Rarities Edition: Paid in Full (2010).


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New York City topics

History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanBritish occupation of New YorkEllis IslandSeptember 11, 2001WTC bombingWorld's FairDraft RiotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotsTammany HallThe Big AppleNYC Subway
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanDowntown ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe NarrowsNewark BayJamaica Bay
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square GardenYankee StadiumCiti FieldTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyUnited Nations HeadquartersSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallOne World Trade CenterRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron BuildingGE BuildingOne Chase Manhattan PlazaGoldman Sachs Building
Transport New York City SubwayIRTBMTINDStaten Island FerryYellow taxisGreen taxisAirTrainJFK AirportLa Guardia AirportNewark Liberty International AirportPort AuthorityNew Jersey TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayPATHTriborough BridgeBrooklyn–Battery TunnelThrogs Neck BridgeHolland TunnelBrooklyn BridgePulaski SkywayTeterboro AirportNew Jersey Turnpike
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall StreetPort NewarkNASDAQAmerican Stock ExchangeNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityThe New SchoolJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan CollegeSt. John's University
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYOEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal CourtSupreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolAuxiliary PoliceDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeMetsYankeesMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyPublic LibraryLincoln Center
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooConey IslandFlushing MeadowsBattery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltHighbridge ParkBowling GreenHigh LineLiberty State
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