Portal:New York City

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The New York City Portal

The Flag of New York City
The location of New York City within New York State

New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York is an important center for international diplomacy and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.

Founded as a trading post by colonists of the Dutch Republic in 1626, the city and its surroundings came under English control in 1664 and were renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a county of New York State. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a census-estimated 2012 population of 8,336,697 distributed over a land area of just 302.64 square miles (783.8 km2), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population of approximately 19.8 million people remains by a significant margin the United States' largest Metropolitan Statistical Area. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world.

Many districts and landmarks in New York City have become well known to its approximately 55 million annual visitors. Several sources have ranked New York the most photographed city in the world. Times Square, iconified as "The Crossroads of the World", is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theatre district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. The names of many of the city's bridges, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world. New York City's financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world's leading financial center and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization of its listed companies. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a globally recognized symbol of the United States and its democracy. Manhattan's Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere. Providing continuous 24/7 service, the New York City Subway is one of the most extensive rapid transit systems worldwide. Numerous colleges and universities are in New York, including Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 35 in the world.

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Illustration of the Great New York City Fire of 1845 from the Bowling Green, July 19, 1845.
The Great New York City Fire of 1845 broke out on July 19, 1845. The fire started in a whale-oil and candle manufacturing establishment and quickly spread to other wooden structures in the neighborhood. It reached a warehouse on Broad Street where combustible saltpeter was stored and caused a massive explosion that spread the fire even farther.

Before it was subdued, the fire destroyed 345 buildings in Lower Manhattan in New York City and caused $5 million to $10 million in damage, as well as killing 4 firefighters and 26 civilians. The 1845 fire was the last of three great fires that affected the heart of Manhattan, including fires in 1776 and 1835. The 1845 fire was very destructive, but it affected mostly older wood-frame construction in a confined section of the city. This proved the efficacy of the fire-resistant building practices that had come into play in surrounding areas of the city in previous decades.

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Beverly Sills in 1956
Beverly Sills (May 25, 1929 – July 2, 2007) was an American operatic soprano who enjoyed success in the 1960s and 1970s. She was famous for her performances in coloratura soprano roles in operas around the world and on recordings. After retiring from singing in 1980, she became the general manager of the New York City Opera. In 1994, she became the Chairman of Lincoln Center and then, in 2002, of the Metropolitan Opera, stepping down in 2005. Sills lent her celebrity to further her charity work for the prevention and treatment of birth defects.

Sills was born Belle Miriam Silverman in Brooklyn, New York to Shirley Bahn (née Sonia Markovna), a musician, and Morris Silverman, an insurance broker. Her parents were Jewish immigrants from Odessa and Bucharest, Romania. She was raised in Brooklyn, where she was known, among friends, as "Bubbles" Silverman. As a child, she spoke Yiddish, Russian, Romanian, French and English. She attended Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, as well as Manhattan's Professional Children's School.

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Jacob Aaron Westervelt

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Track map of all storms known to have made landfall in the state of New York
This list of New York hurricanes encompasses 84 tropical or subtropical cyclones that have affected the state of New York since the 17th century. The state of New York is located along the East Coast of the United States, in the Northeastern portion of the country. The strongest of these storms was the 1938 New England Hurricane, which struck Long Island as a Category 3 storm on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Killing more than 600 people, it was also the deadliest. Tropical cyclones have affected the state primarily in September but have also hit during every month of the hurricane season, June through November. Tropical cyclones rarely make landfall on the state, although it is common for remnants of tropical cyclones to produce heavy rainfall and flooding.

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New York City topics

History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanBritish occupation of New YorkEllis IslandSeptember 11thWTC bombingWorld's FairDraft RiotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotsTammany HallThe Big Apple
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanDowntown ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe NarrowsNewark Bay
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square GardenYankee StadiumCiti FieldTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyUnited Nations HeadquartersSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallOne World Trade CenterRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron BuildingGE BuildingOne Chase Manhattan PlazaGoldman Sachs Building
Transport New York City SubwayIRTBMTStaten Island FerryNew York City Taxi and Limousine CommissionAirTrainJFK AirportLa Guardia AirportNewark Liberty International AirportPort AuthorityNew Jersey TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayLower Manhattan ExpresswayTriborough BridgeBrooklyn–Battery TunnelThrogs Neck BridgeHolland TunnelBrooklyn BridgePulaski SkywayTeterboro AirportNew Jersey Turnpike
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall StreetPort NewarkNASDAQAmerican Stock ExchangeNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityThe New SchoolJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan CollegeSt. John's University
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYOEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal CourtSupreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolAuxiliary PoliceDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeMetsYankeesMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyPublic LibraryLincoln Center
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooConey IslandFlushing MeadowsBattery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltHighbridge ParkBowling GreenLiberty State
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