Gary Leeman

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Gary Leeman
Gary Leeman.jpg
Born (1964-02-19) February 19, 1964 (age 50)
Toronto, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 195 lb (88 kg; 13 st 13 lb)
Position Right Wing/Defence
Shot Right
Played for NHL
Toronto Maple Leafs
Calgary Flames
Montreal Canadiens
Vancouver Canucks
St. Louis Blues
AHL
St. Catharines Saints
Fredericton Canadiens
Worcester IceCats
NHL Draft 24th overall, 1982
Toronto Maple Leafs
Playing career 1983–1999

Gary Spencer Leeman (born February 19, 1964) is a former professional ice hockey player in the NHL. He is best known for being the second Toronto Maple Leaf player ever to score 50 goals or more in a single NHL season (Rick Vaive being the first in 1981-82).

Playing career[edit]

He attended Notre Dame College in Wilcox, Saskatchewan and was a standout defenceman for two seasons with the WHL's Regina Pats where he was voted the league's Top Defenceman and a First Team All-Star.

Leeman was drafted 24th overall by the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1982 NHL Entry Draft as a defenceman, and returned to junior for a season where he scored 86 points in 63 games.

He also represented Canada at the World Junior Championships twice, in Leningrad and in Sweden.

Leeman converted to a winger in the National Hockey League.[1] He was best known as a speedy and gritty scoring machine and he had a 50 goal season to his credit for the Toronto Maple Leafs. He formed the "Hound Line" along with Wendel Clark and Russ Courtnall while helping the Leafs come within a game of the semi-finals. Starting in 1986–87, Gary was a top goal scorer with Toronto and had four straight 20 goal seasons.

After nearly nine seasons in Toronto, Leeman needed a change of scenery and was the key player sent to the Calgary Flames in the blockbuster trade that brought Doug Gilmour to Toronto. To date, the 10 player deal is the largest in NHL history and, looking back, is seen as lopsided in favour of Toronto.[2][3]

As well as the Leafs, Leeman also played for the Flames, Montreal Canadiens, Vancouver Canucks and the St. Louis Blues. He won a Stanley Cup in Montreal in 1993. He played 667 regular season games in the NHL, scoring 199 goals and 267 assists for 466 points.

He finished his career in Germany's Deutsche Eishockey Liga for the Hannover Scorpions. He retired in 1999.

Awards and achievements[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1981–82 Regina Pats WHL 72 19 41 60 112 3 2 2 4 0
1982–83 Regina Pats WHL 63 24 62 86 88 5 1 5 6 4
1982–83 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 2 0 0 0 0
1983–84 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 52 4 8 12 31
1984–85 St. Catharines Saints AHL 7 2 2 4 11
1984–85 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 53 5 26 31 72
1985–86 St. Catharines Saints AHL 25 15 13 28 6
1985–86 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 53 9 23 32 20 10 2 10 12 2
1986–87 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 80 21 31 52 66 5 0 1 1 14
1987–88 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 80 30 31 61 62 2 2 0 2 2
1988–89 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 61 32 43 75 66
1989–90 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 80 51 44 95 63 5 3 3 6 16
1990–91 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 52 17 12 29 39
1991–92 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 34 7 13 20 44
1991–92 Calgary Flames NHL 29 2 7 9 27
1992–93 Calgary Flames NHL 30 9 5 14 10
1992–93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 20 6 12 18 14 11 1 2 3 2
1993–94 Fredericton Canadiens AHL 23 18 8 26 16
1993–94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 31 4 11 15 17 1 0 0 0 0
1994–95 Vancouver Canucks NHL 10 2 0 2 0
1995–96 HC Gherdëina Italy
1996–97 Utah Grizzlies IHL 15 6 1 7 20 4 0 3 3 4
1996–97 Worcester IceCats AHL 24 9 7 16 21
1996–97 St. Louis Blues NHL 2 0 1 1 0
1997–98 Hannover Scorpions DEL 44 13 38 51 16
1998–99 Hannover Scorpions DEL 10 2 3 5 31
NHL totals 667 199 267 466 531 36 8 16 24 36

References[edit]

  1. ^ Associated Press (January 3, 1992). "Flames, Toronto swap 10 players". Eugene Register-Guard. Retrieved 12 August 2013. 
  2. ^ Wilson, Kent (February 8, 2011). "WORST TRADES IN FLAMES HISTORY". Retrieved 12 August 2013. 
  3. ^ Selley, Chris (April 4, 2008). "On second thought...". Maclean's. Retrieved 12 August 2013. 

External links[edit]