Gauliga Mittelrhein

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For the main article, see Gauliga.
Gauliga Mittelrhein
Gauliga Köln-Aachen
Gauliga Moselland
Map of Germany in 1933
Country Nazi Germany
Provinces,
Countries
and Regions
Gau (from 1934)
  • Köln-Aachen
  • Moselland
Founded 1933
Folded 1945 (12 seasons)
Replaced by Oberliga West
Level on pyramid Level 1
Domestic cup(s) Tschammerpokal
Last champions

The Gauliga Mittelrhein was the highest football league in the central and southern part of the Prussian Rhine Province from 1933 to 1945. Shortly after the formation of the league, the Nazis reorganised the administrative regions in Germany, and the Gaue Köln-Aachen and Moselland replaced the Prussian province in the Middle Rhine (German: Mittelrhein) region.

From 1941, the Gauliga Mittelrhein was split into two separate leagues, the Gauliga Köln-Aachen and the Gauliga Moselland. From this time, it also included clubs from the occupied Luxembourg and the Belgian region of Eupen-Malmedy.

Overview[edit]

Gauliga Mittelrhein[edit]

The league was introduced by the Nazi Sports Office in 1933, after the Nazi takeover of power in Germany. It replaced the Bezirksligas and Oberligas as the highest level of play in German football competitions.

In its first season, the league had eleven clubs, playing each other once at home and once away. The league champion then qualified for the German championship. The bottom three teams were relegated. The season after, the league was reduced to ten teams and remained at this strength until 1939. From 1937, it also included Alemannia Aachen which had previously belonged to the Gauliga Niederrhein.

Due to the outbreak of the 2nd World War in 1939, the league was split into two regional groups, a northern division of seven and a southern of six clubs. The two group champions then played a home-and-away final for the Gauliga championship.

In its last season, 1940–41, the league returned to a single-division, ten-team format. At the end of this season, the league was split into two separate Gauligas, divided along the administrative divisions of the two Gaue.

Gauliga Köln-Aachen[edit]

The territory of the new Gauliga Köln-Aachen was made up of the area of the Gau Köln-Aachen and the Eupen-Malmedy region, the German-speaking part of Belgium which had been annexed to the Gau after the German victory in 1940. However, no club from this formerly Belgian region did play at highest level during the war.

The league started with nine clubs in a single division in 1941 and expanded to ten for the 1942-43 season. In its last completed season, 1943–44, it returned to a strength of nine teams. Due to the arrival of the war in the region and the conquest of Aachen by the allied forces, the last season probably not started anymore at all.

Gauliga Moselland[edit]

The territory of the new Gauliga Moselland was made up of the area of the Gau Moselland and Luxembourg, which had been annexed by Germany and added to the Gau after the German victory in 1940.

The league started out with two regional divisions of six clubs each with a home-and-away final to determined the Gauliga champion. The western group compromised two clubs from the city of Trier and four Luxembourgian clubs. The league modus remained the same for the 1942-43 season but the number of clubs from Luxembourg increased to five.

In the 1943-44 season, the eastern group comprised five teams while the western had seven clubs. With the arrival of allied forces in the region in late 1944, football was of low priority and the last season, 1944-45 was probably not started any more.

Aftermath[edit]

With the end of the Nazi era, the Gauligas ceased to exist and the northern part of the region found itself in the British occupation zone while the south became part of the French zone. The annexed regions of Belgium and Luxembourg were taken from Germany again after 1945.

The Oberliga Südwest was introduced as the highest football league in the French occupation zone in 1945, replacing the Gauliga. The territory of the pre-1940 Gau Moselland became part of the new state of Rhineland-Palatinate.

In the British zone, which the former Gau Köln-Aachen was part of, top-level football did not resume straight away, unlike in Southern Germany, and only in 1947 was a new, highest league introduced, the Oberliga West, which covered all of the new state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Founding members of the league[edit]

The eleven founding members and their league positions in the 1932-33 season were:

Winners and runners-up of the Gauliga[edit]

Gauliga Mittelrhein[edit]

Season Winner Runner-Up
1933-34 Mülheimer SV 06 VfR 04 Köln
1934-35 VfR 04 Köln Kölner CfR
1935-36 Kölner CfR Tura 04 Bonn
1936-37 VfR 04 Köln Kölner CfR
1937-38 SV Beuel 06 Alemannia Aachen
1938-39 SpVgg Sülz 07 SSV Troisdorf 05
1939-40 Mülheimer SV 06 SSV Troisdorf 05
1940-41 VfL Köln 99 VfR 04 Köln

Gauliga Köln-Aachen[edit]

Season Winner Runner-Up
1941-42 VfL Köln 99 VfR 04 Köln
1942-43 SV Victoria 11 Köln VfR 04 Köln
1943-44 KSG VfL 99 Köln/SpVgg Sülz 07 SG Düren 99

Gauliga Moselland[edit]

Season Winner Runner-Up
1941-42 FV Stadt Düdelingen Eintracht Kreuznach
1942-43 TuS Neuendorf FK Niederkorn
1943-44 TuS Neuendorf SV Schwarz-Weiß Esch

Placings in the Gauliga 1933-44[edit]

Gauliga Mittelrhein & Köln-Aachen[edit]

Club 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Mülheimer SV 06 3 1 5 4 6 4 7 1 4 3 4
VfR 04 Köln 3 2 1 7 1 8 5 4 2 2 2
SpVgg Sülz 07 3 3 3 6 3 7 1 2 6 7 9
Eintracht Trier 4 8 10
Bonner FV 3 5 7 3 7 9 2 7 9 5
Westmark Trier 6 4 9
Kölner CfR 1 7 2 1 2
Kölner SC 99 1 8 6 5 9
Fortuna Kottenheim 9
Rhenania Köln 10
Blau-Weiß Köln 9
1. FC Idar 10
Tura 04 Bonn 3 2 8 6 3 3 8
TuS Neuendorf 8 10 9 6
Rhenania Würselen 4 5 4 6 8
SV Beuel 06 4 5 1 8 4 10
SpVgg Andernach 2 11 5 9
Alemannia Aachen 4 2 10 7 6 4
VfL 99 Köln 1 3 3 6 3 1 1 3
Kölner BC 10
SSV Troisdorf 2 1 5 6
SG Düren 99 5 3 4 8 2
SV Victoria 11 Köln 5 1 5
SSV Vingst 05 7 9
LSV Bonn 10 10
KSG VfL 99 Köln/SpVgg Sülz 07 3 1
KSG VfR/Mülheimer SV 3 3
Kohlscheider BC 6
SV Bayenthal 7
KSG Bonn 3 8

Source: "Gauliga Mittelrhein & Köln-Aachen". Das deutsche Fussball-Archiv. Retrieved 2009-04-10. 

  • 1 In May 1937, SC 99 Köln and CfR Köln merged to form VfL 99 Köln.
  • 2 SpVgg Andernach joined the new Gauliga Moselland in 1941.
  • 3 The following “war sport unions” (German: KSG) were formed between clubs in 1943:
    • VfL 99 Köln and SpVgg Sülz 07 formed KSG VfL 99 Köln/SpVgg Sülz 07.
    • VfR Köln and SV Mülheim formed KSG VfR/Mülheimer SV.
    • Bonner FV and TuRa Bonn formed KSG Bonn.
  • 4 Title awarded to SV Beuel 06 after the end of season, however, Alemannia Aachen took part in the German championship.

Gauliga Moselland[edit]

Club 1942 1943 1944
Eintracht Kreuznach 1 2 2
TuS Neuendorf 2 1 1
SpVgg Andernach 3 3
FV Engers 07 4 5 5
VfB Lützel 5
Viktoria Neuwied 6 6 6
FV Stadt Düdelingen 1 3 2
Moselland Luxemburg 2 4 5
SV Düdelingen 3 2 4
SV Schwarz-Weiß Esch 4 5 1
Eintracht Trier 4 5 6
Westmark Trier 4 6
Germania Mudersbach 4 4
FK Niederkorn 1 3
Reichsbahn SG Betzdorf 3
Schwarz-Weiß Wasserbillig 6
KSG Trier 4 7

Source: "Gauliga Moselland". Das deutsche Fussball-Archiv. Retrieved 2009-04-10. 

  • 4 Eintracht Trier and Westmark Trier formed KSG Trier for the 1943-44 season.

Clubs from Luxembourg in the Gauliga Moselland[edit]

From 1941, clubs from the occupied country of Luxembourg took part in the German Gauliga system. The most successful of those was the FV Stadt Düdelingen, who reached the German championship finals round, losing to the FC Schalke 04 0-2 in 1942.[1]

The following clubs played in the Gauliga under their Germanised names:

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Die deutschen Gauligen 1933-45 - Heft 1-3 (German) Tables of the Gauligas 1933-45, publisher: DSFS
  • Kicker Almanach, (German) The yearbook on German football from Bundesliga to Oberliga, since 1937, published by the Kicker Sports Magazine

External links[edit]