HNoMS Troll (1910)

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For other ships of the same name, see HNoMS Troll.
Plan Draug class destroyer.gif Plan of Draug class destroyer Troll (1910).jpg
Troll abandoned at Florø, May 1940
Career (Norway)
Name: Troll
Namesake: The Norse mythological creature Troll
Builder: The Royal Norwegian Navy's shipyard at Horten
Yard number: 104[1]
Launched: 7 July 1910[1]
Commissioned: 13 March 1912
Out of service: 4 May 1940
Captured: by the Germans 18 May 1940
Service record
Operations: Norwegian Campaign
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: Troll
Acquired: 18 May 1940
Fate: Handed back to Norway after VE Day
Service record
Operations: Occupation of Norway by Nazi Germany
Career (Norway)
Name: Troll
Acquired: May 1945
Fate: Scrapped in 1949
General characteristics
Class & type: Draug class
Displacement: 578 tons standard [2]
Length: 69.2 m (227.03 ft)
Beam: 7.3 m (23.95 ft)
Draft: 2.9 m (9.51 ft)
Propulsion: Triple expansion steam engine with 7500 hp
Speed: 27 knots (50.00 km/h)
Complement: 76 men
Armament: 6 × 7.6 cm (3 inch) guns
1 × 12.7 mm Colt
anti-aircraft machine gun
3 × trainable 45 cm torpedo tubes

The destroyer HNoMS Troll, known locally as Torpedojager Troll (litt.: torpedo hunter), was the second destroyer built for the Royal Norwegian Navy, as the second ship of the Draug class destroyers. She was built at the naval shipyard in Horten, with yard number 104.[1] She was kept in service long after she was obsolete, and took part in the defence of Norway after the German invasion in 1940.

Norwegian Campaign[edit]

On 9 April Troll was stationed at Måløy, as part of the 2nd Naval District's 1st destroyer division.[3] Commanded by Captain J. Dahl the vessel operated in the Sognefjord after the German invasion.

As the forces in the Sognefjord naval district started surrendering 1 May Troll was ordered to sail to the UK, but due to a lack of both crew and coal the ship was unable to do so. Hence, she struck her flag in Florø on 4 May 1940. The abandoned ship was seized in Florø by the Germans on 18 May.

German service[edit]

After capture Troll, retaining its original name, was rebuilt by the Germans as a distillation vessel and steam supply ship, having her whole superstructure removed. She was used as such at the Laksevåg shipyard near Bergen from 1941 until she was returned to the Royal Norwegian Navy in 1945.[4]

Post-war[edit]

Although Troll survived the war years and was returned to her proper owners, she was by then too worn down to see further service and was sold for scrapping in 1949.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Troll (6103942)". Miramar Ship Index. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Retrieved 11 February 2009. (subscription required)
  2. ^ Abelsen 1986: 28
  3. ^ Niehorster, Leo. "Scandinavian Campaign: Administrative Order of Battle Royal Norwegian Navy 2nd Naval District". Retrieved 10 February 2009. 
  4. ^ Emmerich, Michael. "Troll". German Naval History. Retrieved 11 February 2009. 

Literature[edit]

  • Abelsen, Frank (1986). Norwegian naval ships 1939-1945 (in Norwegian and English). Oslo: Sem & Stenersen AS. ISBN 82-7046-050-8. 

External links[edit]