Insiza River

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Insiza River
Ekusileni.jpg
Ekusileni pontoon ferry, on the Insiza River downstream of Filabusi, Zimbabwe
Origin Fort Rixon, Zimbabwe
Mouth Mzingwane River
Basin countries Zimbabwe
Avg. discharge 25.9 mm/a unit runoff [1]
Basin area 3,401 km2 [2]

The Insiza River is the principal tributary of the Mzingwane River in Zimbabwe.

It rises near Fort Rixon, Insiza District, and flows into the Mzingwane River near West Nicholson.

Hydrology[edit]

The upper reaches of the Insiza River are ephemeral, but below Silalabuhwa Dam, the river flows for two-thirds of the year.[1]

Major tributaries of the Insiza River include the Inkankezi and Siwaze Rivers.

Cities, Towns and Settlements along the River[edit]

The settlements below have are ordered from the beginning of the river to its end:

Bridges and Crossings[edit]

Croft Bridge on the Insiza River near Filabusi.

There are four main bridges over the Insiza River:

There are also a number of crossing points, including:

  • Ekusileni pontoon (see photo at top of page).

Development[edit]

Silalabuhwa Dam.

In addition to a number of small weirs, there are four dams on the Insiza River:

  • Upper Insiza Dam, near Fort Rixon, built in 1967 with a full supply capacity of 8,829 Mm3.
  • Insiza Dam, previously known as Mayfair Dam and Lake Cunningham, built in 1973, with a full supply capacity of 173,491 Mm3. It supplies water to the City of Bulawayo.
  • Pangani Dam, near Filabusi, built to supply water for Pangani mine (now closed and site of a youth training institute.
  • Silalabuhwa Dam, built in 1966, with a full supply capacity of 23,454 Mm3. It is located near the confluence with the Mzingwane River and supplies water for irrigation and to Colleen Bawn.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kileshye-Onema,J.-M., Mazvimavi, D., Love, D. and Mul, M.L. 2006. Effects of selected dams on river flows of Insiza River, Zimbabwe . Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 31, 870-875. [1]
  2. ^ Kileshye Onema, J.-M. and van Rooyen, A. 2007. Landuse dynamics in a small watershed of the semi-arid Zimbabwe. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2007, abstract #B41B-0460 [2]
  3. ^ Chibi, T., Kandori, C. and Makone, B.F. 2005. Mzingwane Catchment Outline Plan. Zimbabwe National Water Authority, Bulawayo.

Coordinates: 20°43′39″S 29°20′34″E / 20.727619°S 29.342666°E / -20.727619; 29.342666