James Edward Grant

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James Edward Grant
Born (1905-07-02)July 2, 1905
Chicago, Illinois
Died February 19, 1966(1966-02-19) (aged 60)
Burbank, California
Occupation Writer
Years active 1935-1966

James Edward Grant (July 2, 1905 – February 19, 1966) was an American short story writer and screenwriter who contributed to more than fifty films between 1935 and 1971.[1]

Born in Chicago, Grant began his career in the mid-1930s developing stories or writing scripts for mostly B movies. He collaborated with John Wayne on twelve projects, starting with Angel and the Badman (which he also directed) in 1947 through Circus World in 1964. Support Your Local Gunfighter was released in 1971, five years after his death.

Grant won the Bronze Wrangler, an annual award presented by the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, twice, for The Alamo in 1961 and The Comancheros the following year. He and William Bowers were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for The Sheepman in 1959.

Grant wrote numerous short stories that were published in Argosy, The Saturday Evening Post, Cosmopolitan, and Liberty, among others.[2]

Grant died from cancer in Burbank, California. He owned a cattle ranch in Winton in Merced County from the 1940s until his death.[citation needed]

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