Jason Pontin

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Jason Pontin
Jason Pontin.jpg
Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher of MIT Technology Review.
Born (1967-05-11) May 11, 1967 (age 46)
London, England, U.K.
Residence Boston, U.S.
Nationality British
Education Harrow School,
University of Oxford
Alma mater Keble College, Oxford
Occupation Editor, journalist, and publisher
Employer MIT Technology Review

Jason Matthew Daniel Pontin (born May 11, 1967) is an editor, journalist and publisher.

Biography[edit]

Pontin was born on May 11, 1967 in London, and raised in Northern California. He was educated in England, at Harrow School and Oxford University.

From 1996 to 2002, Pontin was the editor of Red Herring, a business and technology publication that was popular during the dot-com boom. From 2002 to 2004, he was the editor of The Acumen Journal, a now-defunct magazine about the life sciences that he founded.

Pontin is the editor in chief and publisher of MIT Technology Review, an independent media company owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that identifies new technologies and explains their impact. He was hired as the editor of Technology Review (as it was then known) in July 2004, and in August 2005 was named publisher. As publisher, he is responsible for all the media and business of MIT Technology Review, including its publications, digital platforms, and events. Pontin is engaged in what the Boston Globe has described as a "strategic overhaul" of Technology Review, whose goal is to make the venerable magazine (est. 1899) into a largely electronic publishing company.[1] In October 2012, he renamed the organization MIT Technology Review and relaunched it as a "digital-first enterprise"; AdWeek commented that "Pontin and MIT Technology Review could set the standard for the transition to a digital future for legacy media."[2]

Pontin has written for many national and international magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, The Believer Magazine, and Wired, and is a frequent guest on broadcast, public, and cable television news.

Recognition[edit]

In 2012, MIT Technology Review won the gold and silver prizes for best full issue of a technology magazine (for its June and October 2012 issues), and the gold and bronze prizes for best single article in a technology magazine (for "People Power 2.0" by John Pollock[3] and "The Library of Utopia" by Nicholas Carr[4]) in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards.[5] That same year, MIT Technology Review won the gold prize for best feature design (for "The Library of Utopia" by Nicholas Carr[6]) in the Folio Magazine Ozzie Awards.[7]

In 2011, Technology Review won the silver prize for best full issue of a technology magazine (for its January 2011 issue) and the gold and silver prizes for best single article in a technology magazine (for “Moore's Outlaws” by David Talbot[8] and "Radical Opacity" by Julian Dibbell[9]) in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards.[10] That same year, Technology Review was recognized for the best science and technology coverage in the Utne Reader Independent Press Awards.[11]

In 2010, Technology Review won the gold and silver prizes for best full issue of a technology magazine (for its November and June 2009 issues) and the gold, silver, and bronze prizes for best single article in a technology magazine (for “Natural Gas Changes the Energy Map” by David Rotman;[12] “Prescription: Networking” by David Talbot;[13] and “Chasing the Sun“ by David Rotman[14]) in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards.[15]

In 2009, Technology Review won the gold prize for Best Online News Coverage; the gold and silver prizes for best single articles in a technology magazine (for "How Obama Really Did It" by David Talbot[16] and "Can Technology Save the Economy?" by David Rotman[17] ); and the silver prize for best online community in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards.[18]

In 2008, Technology Review won the gold prize for the best issue of a technology magazine (for its May 2008 issue); the gold, silver, and bronze prizes for best single articles in a technology magazine (for The Price of Biofuels by David Rotman;[19] Brain Trauma in Iraq by Emily Singer;[20] and Una Laptop por Niño by David Talbot [21]); the gold prize for best online community; and the bronze prize for best online tool in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards.[22] That same year, Technology Review won third place in the Magazine Publishers of America (MPA) Digital Awards for best online videos.[23]

In 2007, Technology Review won the bronze prizes in the Folio Magazine Eddie Awards in the categories of best issue of a technology magazine and best single technology article.[24] That same year, technologyreview.com won third place in the MPA Digital Awards for best business or news Website and second place for best online video or video series.[25]

In 2006, Technology Review was a finalist in the National Magazine Awards in the category of General Excellence.[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MIT tech journal getting new publisher, overhaul," Boston Globe, August 30, 2005, p. C1 [1]
  2. ^ "MIT Technology Review Relaunches 'Digital-First'," AdWeek, October 24, 2012 [2]
  3. ^ "People Power" by John Pollock, MIT Technology Review, June 2012 [3]
  4. ^ "The Library of Utopia" by Nicholas Carr, MIT Technology Review, June 2012 [4]
  5. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2012
  6. ^ "The Library of Utopia" by Nicholas Carr, MIT Technology Review, June 2012 [5]
  7. ^ Folio Magazine Ozzie Awards 2012
  8. ^ "Moore's Outlaws" by David Talbot, Technology Review, July 2010 [6]
  9. ^ "Radical Opacity" by Julian Dibbell, Technology Review, September 2010 [7]
  10. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2011
  11. ^ Utne Independent Press Awards 2011
  12. ^ "Natural Gas Changes the Energy Map" by David Rotman, Technology Review, November 2009 [8]
  13. ^ “Prescription: Networking” by David Talbot, Technology Review, July 2009 [9]
  14. ^ "Chasing the Sun" by David Rotman, Technology Review, July 2009 [10]
  15. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2010
  16. ^ How Obama Really Did It by David Talbot, Technology Review, September 2008 [11]
  17. ^ Can Technology Save the Economy? by David Rotman, Technology Review, May 2008 [12]
  18. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2009
  19. ^ The Price of Biofuels by David Rotman, Technology Review, January 2008 [13]
  20. ^ Brain Trauma in Iraq by Emily Singer, Technology Review, May 2008 [14]
  21. ^ Una Laptop por Niño by David Talbot, Technology Review, May 2008 [15]
  22. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2008
  23. ^ MPA Digital Awards 2008
  24. ^ Folio Magazine Eddie Awards 2007
  25. ^ MPA Digital Awards 2007
  26. ^ National Magazine Award Finalists 2006

External links[edit]