Jim Hudson

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For other people named James Hudson, see James Hudson (disambiguation).
Jim Hudson
Born (1943-03-31)March 31, 1943
Steubenville, Ohio, United States
Died June 25, 2013(2013-06-25) (aged 70)
Austin, Texas, United States
Position(s) Safety
College Texas
Statistics
Teams
1965-1970 New York Jets

Jim Hudson (March 31, 1943 – June 25, 2013) was a professional American Football defensive back. Hudson played for the New York Jets from 1965 to 1970, playing in both the AFL and NFL.[1] He started in Super Bowl III for the Jets, and made a key interception just before the end of the first half.[2]

Hudson was born in Steubenville, Ohio. He played both defensive back and quarterback at Texas, and played on the team that won the NCAA championship in 1963.[3] His 69-yard touchdown pass to George Sauer in the 1965 Orange Bowl helped Texas to victory over Alabama and attracted the attention of Jets scouts who had come to watch Crimson Tide quarterback Joe Namath.[4] After being teammates as Texas, Hudson and Sauer would continue as teammates for the New York Jets for five years from 1965 through 1969.

After his playing career, Hudson became a successful trainer of thoroughbred horses.[5][4] He was inducted into the University of Texas Men's Hall of Honor in 2012.[4]

Hudson lived in Austin, Texas with his wife Lise, until his death there on June 25, 2013. He died from traumatic dementia encephalophathy at the age of 70.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NFL.com. "Jim Hudson, DB". Retrieved on May 9, 2013.
  2. ^ Maule, Tex. "Say It's So, Joe". Sports Illustrated, January 20, 1969. Retrieved on May 9, 2013.
  3. ^ Sports Illustrated. "A Royal Place". September 21, 1964. Retrieved on May 9, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Moran, Gaby. "Longhorn Hall of Honor: Jim Hudson". TexasFootball.com, November 5, 2012. Retrieved on May 9, 2013.
  5. ^ Drape, Joe. "A Lone Star Boy's New Glory". New York Times, July 10, 1997. Retrieved on May 9, 2013.
  6. ^ Jim Hudson, former Longhorn, dies
Preceded by
Duke Carlisle
University of Texas Quarterback
1964
Succeeded by
Marvin Kristynik