John Pickering (soldier)

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John Pickering (died 1645), parliamentarian: brother of Sir Gilbert Pickering; of Gray's Inn, 1634; commanded a regiment in the Eastern Association (the Parliamentary army under the command of Edward Montagu, Earl of Manchester's) and in the New Model Army.[1]

Biography[edit]

John Pickering was the second son of Sir John Pickering. He was admitted to Gray's Inn on 10 October 1634.[2]

In 1641 he was engaged in carrying messages from the parliament to its committee in Scotland,[3] and like his elder brother Sir Gilbert Pickering adopted the parliamentary cause. He commanded a regiment in the Eastern Association (the Parliamentary army under the command of Edward Montagu, Earl of Manchester), fought at the Battle of Marston Moor, and was one of Cromwell's witnesses against Manchester.[4]

On the formation of the New Model Army, Colonel Ayloffe's regiment was incorporated with Pickering's, and the command given to the latter.[5] Pickering took part in the Battle of Naseby, the Siege of Bristol, and the captures of Lacock House in Wiltshire, and Winchester.[6] Pickering died in November 1645 at St. Mary Ottery, Devonshire.[7]

Character assessment[edit]

On his death Sprigge, who terms him "a little man, but of a great courage", inserts a short poem celebrating his virtues.[8] A prose character of him is contained in John Cooke's Vindication of the Law.[9] Pickering was a zealous puritan, and in 1645 caused a mutiny in his regiment by insisting on giving them a sermon.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lee 1903, p. 1040.
  2. ^ Firth 1888, pp. 242, 423 cites Foster, Register of Gray's Inn, p. 206.
  3. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Commons' Journals, ii. 315, 330.
  4. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Markham, Life of Lord Fairfax, p. 157; Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1644–5, p. 151.
  5. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Commons' Journals, iv. 90, 123.
  6. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Sprigge, Anglia Rediviva, 1854, pp. 116, 127, 135, 140.
  7. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423.
  8. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Sprigge, Anglia Rediviva, 1854, p. 168.
  9. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites John Cooke's Vindication of the Law 4to, 1646, p. 81.
  10. ^ Firth 1888, p. 423 cites Gardiner, Great Civil War, ii. 192.

References[edit]

Attribution

Further reading[edit]