John Pinch the elder

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John Pinch the elder (1769 – 1827) was an architect working mainly in the city of Bath, England. He was surveyor to the Pulteney and Darlington estate and responsible for many of the later Georgian buildings in Bath, especially in Bathwick. His son, John Pinch the younger, was also an architect and surveyor to the Pulteney and Darlington estate. His daughter, Celia Pinch, married the silversmith William Holme Twentyman on Mauritius.

Biography[edit]

John Pinch was born at Callington, Cornwall where he was christened on 4 January 1769. He started as an architect and builder in the 1790s. He was assistant to Thomas Baldwin as surveyor to the Pulteney estate and succeeded him as surveyor after Baldwin's bankruptcy in 1793; when the estate passed into the ownership of the Earl of Darlington he retained his position. John Pinch married Martha Cleave (1772 – 1830) on Christmas Eve, 1792 at St Mellion, Cornwall and died 11 March 1827 in Bath.

Works[edit]

His earliest identified work is Babington House in Babington, Somerset which was built in 1790.[1] A few years later he completed Northampton Street in Bath which had been started by Thomas Baldwin, and was completed by George Phillips Manners.

New commissions included Rockfield House in Nunney in 1805 and various properties in Bath including: New Sydney Place (1807),[2] Daniel Street (1810) and Raby Place (1825), Bathwick.

Norfolk Crescent in Bath was started around 1793 by John Palmer and continued about 1820 by John Pinch.[3] A similar completion of Palmer's designs was Nelson Place.

Pinch also has his own projects in Bath including, between 1808 and 1815 Cavendish Place,[4] Cavendish Crescent (1817–1830),[5] Sion Hill Place (1817–1820),[6] Cleveland Pools (c.1814),[7] St Mary's Church, Bathwick (1817–1820),[8] Spa Villa, Bathwick Hill (1820), Prior Park Buildings, a terrace of 19 houses off Prior Park Road, built from 1820, St. Michael's Church, Twerton (1824) and the Royal United Hospital in Beau Street, Bath (1824–1826).

Outside Bath he worked the Wiltshire buildings of St Lawrence's Church in Hungerford (1814–1816), Corsley House, Corsley (1814), Bishopstrow House (1817–1821) and the Mausoleum for Richard Colt Hoare at St Peter's Church in Stourton (1819).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Babington House". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Nos 93 to 103 (consec) Sydney Place". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  3. ^ "Cumberland House". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Forsyth, Michael (2003). Pevsner Architectural Guides: Bath. 
  5. ^ "1-11 Cavendish Crescent". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  6. ^ "Summerhill and numbers 1 to 9". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  7. ^ "Cleveland Baths". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  8. ^ "History". St Mary's Churchyard. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  • Robert Bennet, The last of the Georgian architects of Bath: the life and times of John Pinch, Bath History IX (2002) 87–103
  • H.M. Colvin, A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects, 1600-1840 (1997) ISBN 0-300-07207-4
  • M. Forsyth, Bath, Pevsner Architectural Guides (2003) ISBN 0-300-10177-5
  • Maurice Scott, Discovering Widcombe and Lyncombe, Bath, 1993, ISBN )-9520876-0-X