KDAA

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For the military facility in Fort Belvoir, Virginia assigned the ICAO code KDAA, see Davison Army Airfield.
KDAA
Sam103-1logo.jpg
City of license Rolla, Missouri
Branding 'SAM 103.1: Simply About Music'
Slogan 'You never know what you will hear next!'
Frequency 103.1 MHz
Format Adult Hits
ERP 2,050 watts
HAAT 174 meters (571 ft)
Class A
Facility ID 53649
Transmitter coordinates 37°52′39″N 91°44′45″W / 37.87750°N 91.74583°W / 37.87750; -91.74583Coordinates: 37°52′39″N 91°44′45″W / 37.87750°N 91.74583°W / 37.87750; -91.74583
Former callsigns KCLU-FM (1981-1989)
KQMX (1989-1995)
Affiliations Dial Global
Owner KTTR-KZNN, Inc. (known as Results Radio)
Sister stations KTTR, KTTR-FM, KXMO-FM, KZNN
Website Official website

KDAA (103.1 FM, "Sam 103.1") is a radio station broadcasting an adult hits music format.[1] Licensed to Rolla, Missouri, USA, the station is currently owned by KTTR-KZNN, Inc., known as "Results Radio."[2]

History[edit]

The station was assigned the call letters KCLU-FM on March 24, 1981. On February 10, 1989, the station changed its call sign to KQMX, and on October 1, 1995, to the current KDAA.[3] On July 17, 2000, the station's license was transferred from Eikon Media, Inc. to KDAA-KMOZ, LLC, along with the license for KMOZ.[4] On September 26, 2006, the licenses for KDAA and sister station KXMO-FM were transferred to the current owner, KTTR-KZNN, Inc., for $825,000.[5]

KDAA logo.jpg

Prior to adopting the Sam 103.1 branding, the station was known as "KDAY: Classic Hits 103.3".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Summer 2009. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 
  2. ^ "KDAA Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 
  3. ^ "KDAA Call Sign History". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Application Search Details". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Application Search Details". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 

External links[edit]