Kip Meek

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Kip Meek (born 18 April 1955[1]), full name Kingsley John Neville Meek, is a British businessperson specialising in media and telecommunication.

Career[edit]

Kip Meek held board level roles at Ofcom from 2003 until 2007.[2] He joined Ofcom as senior partner for content and competition.[3]

He assisted Ofcom's first Chief Executive Stephen Carter integrating existing telecoms and media regulators into a single organisation.

In 2005 he became Ofcom's Chief Policy Officer and Chairman of the European Regulators' Group (ERG), handling Ofcom's relationship with European and International political institutions.[3] He also had responsibility for Ofcom's Content & Standards Group, and Ofcom's Legal Group.

Kip Meek was a founder and Managing Director of Spectrum Strategy Consulting, incorporated in 1993 (a consultancy specialising in media, telecommunications, and information technology).

Previous positions include leading Coopers & Lybrand's media and telecoms strategy practice in London, and positions at the Boston Consulting Group, McKinsey & Co and British Telecom.[4]

On 23 July 2010, Kip Meek was announced as non-executive chairman of Project Canvas (now YouView).[5] Meek leads the Board of the venture and oversaw the appointment of Chief Executive Officer, Richard Halton. He stepped down from his role as Director of Ingenious Media.[6] He also left his positions as Chairman of the Broadband Stakeholder Group and a director of the RadioCentre and Phorm.[2][4] Meek left YouView on 7 March 2011 and was replaced by Alan Sugar.[7]
As of March 2011 he is employed at EE as an adviser and is part of Communications Chambers.

Controversy[edit]

His role as a member of Phorm's board was claimed to conflict with his work as a taxpayer-funded advisor on UK internet policy for BERR during the publication of the Digital Britain strategy.[8]

As the same time, the UK Government faced European Commission infraction proceedings,[9] following the covert trials of Phorm's technology by British Telecom in 2006 and 2007.[10][11]

Education[edit]

  • 1979-81 London Business School, MSc with Distinction
  • 1973-76 Magdalen College, Oxford, First Class Honours, Modern History

Roles[edit]

  • 1977 Consultant, Boston Consulting Group
  • 1981 Consultant, McKinsey & Co
  • 1984 Deputy director of marketing, BT
  • 1986 Managing director, Octagon Services
  • 1988 Partner, Coopers & Lybrand
  • 1993 Founder, Spectrum Strategy Consultants
  • 2003 Senior partner, Ofcom
  • 2005 Chief policy officer, Ofcom
  • 2007 MD, Ingenious Consulting; chairman, BSG; director, RadioCentre
  • 2010 Non-Executive Chairman, YouView

Directorships[edit]

  • Ingenious Media Consulting Limited
  • Ingenious Media Limited
  • Perspective Associates Limited
  • RadioCentre Limited

See also[edit]

"Response to Ovum’s report "Telstra ULLS Undertaking – ULLS International Benchmarking"". Ingenious Consulting Network. December 2008. Retrieved 4 August 2009.  (includes full CV).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gibson, Owen (31 March 2008). "Interview: Kip Meek, 'A 2+2=5 situation'". The Guardian (London: The Guardian). Retrieved 4 August 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Biography at Phorm
  3. ^ a b Kip Meek joins RadioCentre as non-exec
  4. ^ a b Biography at Broadband Stakeholder Group
  5. ^ "Kip Meek to become chairman of Project Canvas". Project Canvas. 2010-07-23. 
  6. ^ Biography at Ingenious Media
  7. ^ "Kip Meek leaves role as YouView Non-Executive Chairman". YouView. 2011-03-07. 
  8. ^ Williams, Chris (15 April 2009). "Phorm director advises UK.gov broadband minister, Conflicts denied as Amazon opts out". The Register (London: The Register). Retrieved 4 August 2009. 
  9. ^ Commission launches case against UK over privacy and personal data protection
  10. ^ Williams, Chris (1 April 2008). "BT and Phorm secretly tracked 18,000 customers in 2006". The Register (London: The Register). Retrieved 4 August 2009. 
  11. ^ Williams, Chris (14 April 2008). "BT's 'illegal' 2007 Phorm trial profiled tens of thousands". The Register (London: The Register). Retrieved 4 August 2009.