Kiss Kiss (book)

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Kiss Kiss
Dahl Kiss Kiss.jpg
Dust-jacket from the first edition
Author Roald Dahl
Country United States
Language English
Genre Fantasy Science fiction short stories
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf
Publication date
1960
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages 309 pp
ISBN NA

Kiss Kiss is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl, first published in 1960 by Alfred A. Knopf. Most of the constituent stories had been previously published elsewhere.

It contains the following short stories:

Without becoming horror, these are some of Dahl's most macabre stories. Delicately, the naive punish the wicked, but also the other way around.

Most of the stories are presented as typical narratives, albeit with imaginative characters. The horror of each story is built around implication, and many horrific endings, involving death or unpleasant situations, can only be inferred, since nothing is directly stated.

"The Champion of the World" is a condensed version of the story that would become Dahl's 1977 children's book, Danny the Champion of the World.

Editions[edit]

  • Knopf, New York, 1960, 309 pp
  • McCleland, Toronto, 1960
  • M. Joseph, London, 1960, 255 pp
  • Hayakawa, Japan, 1961, Paperback, Japanese as Tales of Menace 1
  • Dell:F128, New York, 1961, 288 pp, Paperback
  • Bonnier, Stockholm, 1961, Swedish as Puss puss
  • Penguin:1832, Harmondsworth, 1962, 233 pp, Paperback, ISBN 0-14-001832-8 (1973 reprint)
  • Feltrinelli, Milano, 1964, 276 pp, Italian as Kiss Kiss: 11 storie macabre (con humour)
  • Rowohlt, Reinbek, German as Küßchen, Küßchen

Critical response[edit]

Lorna Bradbury, Deputy Literary Editor for The Daily Telegraph, listed the collection as one of "25 Classic Novels for Teenagers."[1] Zoe Chace of NPR told interviewer Cara Philbin her reactions during reading the collection as a child: "Kiss Kiss is for grownups... It was actually the marriages that I remember feeling the worst about... Reading Kiss Kiss is one of the first times I can remember a real-life truth staring back at me from a book. I hadn't yet thought about the nasty tricks adults play on each other just to hurt each other. Particularly, married adults who aren't in love and who might know the others weakness best. My imagination matured."[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bradbury, Lorna (5 April 2012). "25 classic novels for teenagers". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 
  2. ^ Philbin, Cara (July 3, 2012). "Zoe Chace Found An Unwelcome Truth Lurking in Roald Dahl's "Kiss Kiss"". NPR. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]