Lambton—Kent—Middlesex (provincial electoral district)

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Lambton—Kent—Middlesex
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Middlesex-Kent-Lambton.png
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
MPP
 
 
 
Monte McNaughton
Progressive Conservative
District created 1999
First contested 1999
Last contested 2014
Demographics
Population (2006) 107,635
Electors (2007) 75,997
Area (km²) 5,277
Pop. density (per km²) 20.4
Census divisions Chatham-Kent, Lambton County, Middlesex County
Census subdivisions Lambton Shores, Warwick, Brooke-Alvinston, Dawn-Euphemia, Southwest Middlesex, Newbury, Adelaide Metcalfe, Strathroy-Caradoc, Oneida 41, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation 42, Walpole Island 46, Chatham-Kent, North Middlesex, Lucan Biddulph, Middlesex Centre
For the federal electoral district see Lambton—Kent—Middlesex.

Lambton—Kent—Middlesex is a provincial electoral district in southwestern Ontario, Canada. It elects one member to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

It was created in 1999 from parts of Lambton, Chatham—Kent and Middlesex when ridings were redistributed to match their federal counterparts.

From 1999 to 2007 the riding consisted of the municipalities of Lambton Shores, Warwick, Brooke-Alvinston, Dawn-Euphemia, Southwest Middlesex, Newbury, Adelaide Metcalfe, Strathroy-Caradoc, Oneida 41, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation 42, Plympton-Wyoming, Enniskillen, Petrolia, Oil Springs, Walpole Island 46, Chatham-Kent north of the Thames River and not including the former city of Chatham, and the southwest third of North Middlesex.

In 2007, the riding was redistributed, and it lost Plympton-Wyoming, Enniskillen, Petrolia, Oil Springs while it gained the rest of North Middlesex, Lucan Biddulph and Middlesex Centre.

Considered a bellwether or swing riding, the area tends to attract frequent visits by party leaders during elections. The political instability of the riding is largely attributed to the diversity of political and religious opinion within its borders. A rural riding by nature, the issues of gun control and abortion arise frequently during town-hall meetings and elections. At the same time the largely Liberal areas of Strathroy and Petrolia tend to balance the more conservative rural regions. The Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) also has pockets of support in Wallaceburg.

During the 1999 election, the riding attracted controversy as it included Ipperwash Provincial Park - the sight of the 1995 stand-off between the Ontario Provincial Police and native land protesters. Political events in the riding became frequent targets for further protests by natives unhappy with the Conservative Government's handling of the Ipperwash Affair and the associated shooting death of protester Dudley George. Despite the controversy, Progressive Conservative MPP Marcel Beaubien was re-elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, despite a strong campaign by Liberal and municipal politician Larry O'Neil and an aggressive campaign by New Democrat Jim Lee, then-President of UAW Local 251 [1] [2].

Members of Provincial Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario:

Lambton—Kent—Middlesex
Assembly Years Member Party
Riding created from Lambton, Chatham—Kent and Middlesex
37th  1999 − 2003     Marcel Beaubien Progressive Conservative
38th  2003 − 2007     Maria Van Bommel Liberal
39th  2007 − 2011
40th  2011 − 2014     Monte McNaughton Progressive Conservative
41st  2014 − Present

Election results[edit]

Ontario general election, 2014
** Preliminary results — Not yet official **
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Monte McNaughton 20,609 45.06 -0.67
New Democratic Joe Hill 12,157 26.58 +5.62
Liberal Mike Radan 9,297 20.33 -8.99
Green James Armstrong 2,103 4.60 +2.27
Family Coalition Marinus Vander Vloet 560 1.22 +0.39
None of the Above Bob Lewis 552 1.21
Freedom Dave Durnin 242 0.53 +0.25
Libertarian Matt Willson 213 0.47
Total valid votes 45,733 100.00
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -3.15
Source: Elections Ontario[1]
Ontario general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Monte McNaughton 19,379 45.73 +9.41
Liberal Maria Van Bommel 12,423 29.32 -13.91
New Democratic Joe Hill 8,882 20.96 +10.21
Green James Armstrong 987 2.33 -5.57
Family Coalition Marinus Vander Vloet 350 0.83 -0.47
Reform Brad Harness 232 0.55 +0.06
Freedom Tom Jackson 119 0.28  
Total valid votes 42,372 100.00
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 177 0.42
Turnout 42,549 54.08
Eligible voters 78,683
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +11.66
Source: Elections Ontario[2]
Ontario general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Maria van Bommel 18,191 43.23 -1.88
Progressive Conservative Monte McNaughton 15,281 36.32 -0.34
New Democratic Joyce Jolliffe 4,522 10.75 -0.26
Green James Armstrong 3,326 7.90 +5.14
Family Coalition Bill McMaster 547 1.30
Reform Brad Harness 208 0.49
Total valid votes 42,075 100.00
Ontario general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Maria Van Bommel 18,533 45.11 +2.17
Progressive Conservative Marcel Beaubien 15,060 36.66 -8.34
New Democratic Joyce Jolliffe 4,523 11.01 +1.42
Green Tim Van Bodegom 1,133 2.76
Independent James Armstrong 1,053 2.56
Freedom Wayne Forbes 780 1.90 -0.58
Total valid votes 41,082 100.00
Ontario general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Marcel Beaubien 19,561 45.00
Liberal Larry O'Neill 18,665 42.94
New Democratic Jim Lee 4,170 9.59
Freedom Wayne H. Forbes 1,076 2.48
Total valid votes 43,472 100.00

2007 electoral reform referendum[edit]

Ontario electoral reform referendum, 2007
Side Votes %
First Past the Post 28,144 68.8
Mixed member proportional 12,775 31.2
Total valid votes 40,919 100.0

Sources[edit]

Coordinates: 42°48′N 81°48′W / 42.8°N 81.8°W / 42.8; -81.8