Larkin Goldsmith Mead

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named Goldsmith, see Goldsmith (disambiguation).
Mead, between 1865 and 1880.

Larkin Goldsmith Mead, Jr. (January 3, 1835 – October 15, 1910) was an American sculptor, working in a neoclassical style.

Career[edit]

Mead, circa 1862.

He was born at Chesterfield, New Hampshire, the son of a prominent lawyer. He became a pupil of sculptor Henry Kirke Brown, (1853–1855). He worked as an illustrator for Harper's Weekly during the early part of the American Civil War, and was at the front for six months with the Army of the Potomac. In 1862-1865, he traveled to Italy, working for a time in Florence, and also spending part of the time attached to the United States consulate at Venice, where William Dean Howells, his brother-in-law, was diplomatic consul. He married in Venice.[1] He returned to America in 1865, but subsequently returned to Italy, where he lived in Florence where he lived until his death.

His first important work was a statue of Agriculture, designed to top the dome of the Vermont Statehouse at Montpelier, Vermont. This work proved so successful that he was soon commissioned to sculpt a statue of Ethan Allen for the Statehouse portico.

Other principal works include: the granite and bronze Lincoln Tomb, a sculptured mausoleum to President Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Illinois; Ethan Allen (1876), National Statuary Hall, United States Capitol, Washington, DC; a heroic marble, Mississippi – The Father of Waters, Minneapolis City Hall; Triumph of Ceres, made for the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois, 1893; and a large bust of Lincoln in the Hall of Inscriptions at the Vermont Statehouse.

His brother William Rutherford Mead (1846–1928) was a well-known architect, the Mead of McKim, Mead, and White.

He is buried in the Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori in the southern suburb of Florence, Galluzzo (Italy).

Selected works[edit]

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb (ca. 1870-83), Springfield, Illinois.

Lincoln Tomb, Springfield, Illinois[edit]

  • United States Coat of Arms, bronze, ca. 1870.
  • Statue of Abraham Lincoln, bronze, 1871-72.
  • The Infantry Group, bronze, 1874-76.
  • The Naval Group, bronze, 1874-77.
  • The Artillery Group, bronze, 1882.
  • The Cavalry Group, bronze, 1883.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dizionario degli Artisti Italiani Viventi: pittori, scultori, e Architetti., by Angelo de Gubernatis. Tipe dei Successori Le Monnier, 1889, page 291.
  2. ^ Echo from Smithsonian Institution.
  3. ^ Venezia from MMA.
  4. ^ Returned Soldier from Chrysler Museum of Art.
  5. ^ Thought from Bangor Public Library.
  6. ^ Lincoln bust from Flickr.
  7. ^ Longfellow
  8. ^ Washington Inauguration from Christie's, New York.
  9. ^ Ione from Bangor Public Library.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]