List of Stanford Cardinal head football coaches

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David Shaw, current head coach of the Stanford Cardinal football team

The Stanford Cardinal football program represents Stanford University in the North Division of the Pacific-12 Conference. The Cardinal competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The team has had 31 head coaches since its founding in 1892.

The Cardinal have played in 1,080 games of American football in 112 seasons.[A 1] In their first season, the team played 4 games with no head coach.[1] From 1906 to 1917, Stanford replaced football with rugby.[1] The school did not field teams in 1918 and from 1943 to 1945 due to World War I and World War II, respectively.[1]

Conference championships have been won by "Pop" Warner, "Tiny" Thornhill, Clark Shaughnessy, Chuck Taylor, John Ralston, Bill Walsh, Tyrone Willingham, and David Shaw.[1] Warner is the all-time leader in games coached and most victories.[1] James F. Lanagan is the leader in win percentage for coaches with more than one season of service.[1]

Of the 31 Stanford head coaches, six—Walter Camp,[2] Fielding H. Yost,[3] Andrew Kerr,[4] Warner,[5] Shaughnessy,[6] and Ralston[7]—have been inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame as coaches. Four more—George H. Brooke (who played at Swarthmore),[8] Marchmont Schwartz (who played at Notre Dame),[9] Taylor (who played at Stanford)[10] and Paul Wiggin (who also played at Stanford)[11]—are in the Hall of Fame as players.

Stanford's current head coach is David Shaw, who was Pac-12 Coach of the Year in 2011 and 2012.

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 2]
# Order of coaches[A 3] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 4] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 5]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships and selected awards[A 6]
# Name Season(s) GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL PT DC
[A 7]
CC
[A 8]
NC Awards
1 Camp, WalterWalter Campdagger 1892
1894–1895
17 11 3 3 .735 0
2 Bliss, C. D. "Pop"C. D. "Pop" Bliss 1893 9 8 0 1 .944 0
3 Cross, Harry P.Harry P. Cross 1896
1898
13 7 4 2 .615 0
4 Brooke, George H.George H. Brookedagger 1897 5 4 1 0 .800 0
5 Chamberlain, BurrBurr Chamberlain 1899 9 2 5 2 .333 0
6 Yost, Fielding H.Fielding H. Yostdagger 1900 10 7 2 1 .750 0
7 Fickert, CharlesCharles Fickert 1901 7 3 2 2 .571 0 1 0 0
8 Clemans, Carl L.Carl L. Clemans 1902 7 6 1 0 .857 0
9 Lanagan, James F.James F. Lanagan 1903–1905 29 23 2 4 .862 0
10 Evans, BobBob Evans 1919 7 4 3 0 .571 1 1 0 .500 0 0 0 0 0
11 Powell, Walter D.Walter D. Powell 1920 7 4 3 0 .571 2 1 0 .667 0 0 0 0 0
12 Van Gent, EugeneEugene Van Gent 1921 8 4 2 2 .625 1 1 0 .500 0 0 0 0 0
13 Kerr, AndrewAndrew Kerrdagger 1922–1923 18 11 7 0 .611 3 5 0 .375 0 0 0 0 0
14 Warner, Glenn "Pop"Glenn "Pop" Warnerdagger 1924–1932 96 71 17 8 .781 31 9 5 .744 1 1 1 3 1 – 1926
15 Thornhill, Claude "Tiny"Claude "Tiny" Thornhill 1933–1939 67 35 25 7 .575 25 18 4 .574 1 2 0 3 0
16 Shaughnessy, ClarkClark Shaughnessydagger 1940–1941 19 16 3 0 .842 11 3 0 .786 1 0 0 1 1 – 1940 AFCA Coach of the Year (1940)[15]
17 Schwartz, MarchmontMarchmont Schwartzdagger 1942
1946–1950
60 28 28 4 .500 17 25 3 .411 0 0 0 0 0
18 Taylor, ChuckChuck Taylordagger 1951–1957 71 40 29 2 .577 25 20 2 .553 0 1 0 1 0 AFCA Coach of the Year (1951)[15]
19 Curtice, JackJack Curtice 1958–1962 50 14 36 0 .280 5 19 0 .208 0 0 0 0 0
20 Ralston, JohnJohn Ralstondagger 1963–1971 94 55 36 3 .601 30 25 2 .544 2 0 0 2 0 Sporting News College Football Coach of the Year (1970)[16]
21 Christiansen, JackJack Christiansen 1972–1976 55 30 22 3 .573 22 12 1 .643 0 0 0 0 0
22 Walsh, BillBill Walsh 1977–1978
1992–1994
59 34 24 1 .585 19 19 0 .500 3 0 0 1 0 Pac-8 Coach of the Year (1977)[17]
23 Dowhower, RodRod Dowhower 1979 11 5 5 1 .500 3 3 1 .500 0 0 0 0 0
24 Wiggin, PaulPaul Wiggindagger 1980–1983 44 16 28 0 .364 11 23 0 .324 0 0 0 0 0
25 Elway, JackJack Elway 1984–1988 56 25 29 2 .464 16 22 2 .425 0 1 0 0 0
26 Green, DennisDennis Green 1989–1991 34 16 18 0 .471 13 11 0 .542 0 1 0 0 0
27 Willingham, TyroneTyrone Willingham 1995–2001 81 44 36 1 .549 32 24 0 .571 1 3 0 1 0 Pac-10 Coach of the Year (1999)[17]
28 Teevens, BuddyBuddy Teevens 2002–2004 33 10 23 .303 5 19 .208 0 0 0 0
29 Harris, WaltWalt Harris 2005–2006 23 6 17 .261 5 12 .294 0 0 0 0
30 Harbaugh, JimJim Harbaugh 2007–2010 50 29 21 .580 21 15 .583 1 1 0 0
31 Shaw, DavidDavid Shaw 2011–present 41 34 7 .829 23 4 .852 1 2 2 2 0 Pac-12 Coach of the Year (2011, 2012)[17]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ For 12 seasons from 1906 to 1917, Stanford replaced football with rugby. The school includes rugby matches as part of the overall football record.[1]
  2. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[12]
  3. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  4. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[13]
  5. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[14]
  6. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2012 college football season.
  7. ^ Divisional champions have advanced to the Pacific-12 Football Championship Game since the institution of divisional play beginning in the 2011 season. Since that time, Stanford has competed as a member of the Pac-12 North.
  8. ^ Stanford was not a part of an athletic conference prior to 1919, when the school joined the Pacific Coast Conference. After the demise of that conference, the school joined the new Athletic Association of Western Universities in 1959, which became the Pacific-8 Conference in 1968, the Pacific-10 Conference in 1978, and the Pacific-12 Conference in 2011.[1]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "The History". 2013 Stanford Football Media Guide. Stanford, California: Stanford Department of Athletics. 2013. pp. 145–153. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Walter "The Father of Football" Camp". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Andrew Kerr". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Pop Warner". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Clark Shaughnessy". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail:John Ralston". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: George H. Brooke". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Marchy Schwartz". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Chuck Taylor". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee detail: Paul Wiggin". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  12. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  13. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  14. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  15. ^ a b "Past National COTY Winners". American Football Coaches Association. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Plunkett named best by Sporting News". Youngstown Vindicator. December 9, 1970. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c "2012 Pac-12 Conference Football Media Guide". Pac-12 Communications Department. 2013. p. 121.